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Cardboard Insulation

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey All!

 

So I have about a 4x4 coop inside of a 7x7 run.  The coop is off the ground and the chicks have constant access to the run (the run is secure).  The coop and run is covered.  I will put plastic sheeting on most sides of the run.  All the way to the top in the areas with prevailing winds and about 1/2 way on the sides that face away from prevailing winds. I don't think I need to do this, but I'm gonna double check.  Do I need to add something as insulation to the inside of the coop?  We are in UT.  We can have really cold spells for long periods of time.  We get freezing temperatures and snow (but not always). 

 

I plan on leaving the coop door open year round for air intake and the top of the coop is all ventilation between the top of the coop and the roof of the coop (I could cover some of the open area if necessary). I was thinking of using corrugated cardboard as the insulator if it is necessary - has anyone heard of using that? 

 

Thanks in advance. 

post #2 of 6

Nah probably not needed...the covered run should block most wind and the coop should block the rest.

 

Can you post a pic of your setup?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

This is early on before I had the chickens.  I haven't added the roof or plastic on the walls so this is pretty much it.  The pop door is on the right in that picture. The run is secure so we don't close the pop door at night.  We do get eastern canyon winds, but they will stop during the winter. The run is a 7'x7' cube and about a 3.5' x 3.5' coop.  They have one nesting box that is inside of their coop.   The roof of the run will slant toward the front because that faces south.  Our prevailing winds are East and West (so the roof is not a sail).  We get snow.  Some years a lot, other years none.  Sometimes it warms up and melts off quickly, other times we don't make it to freezing for weeks on end after a storm.  Much of the November-March season it does get above freezing each day (or close to it, especially in the sun).  The coop/run will have good south sun in the winter because the trees to the south of it are not deciduous.  We plan on running an extension cord out to the coop/run to heat water during periods of freezing temperatures . . . also to run lights.  We just don't have the $1500 to run electrical to the coop.  The top of the coop has hardware cloth and then a 2"-3" gap before the corrugated roof for ventilation.  I plan on placing an LED rope light above the hardware cloth to light the coop during the winter months.  Next spring, I will add on to the run - another 8'x8' cube or so. . . so I can add a chick or two (depending on how much time I think the chicks spend in the coop in the winter).  The coop isn't that big, but with the run I think they might be OK to have a couple more in there with the outdoor space enlarged.  I will not cover the additional run space because I plan on planting it with things like alfalfa periodically.  I can always add an additional shelter for the chickens in the new run - like a dog house with a roost in it. We put pine shavings and shredded straw in the coop and pine shavings and whatever organic material from the yard in the run.  So far, no flies, no smell, and the chickies love it.  I have a brite tap waterer and LOVE it after using regular fountains for awhile.  The water stays pretty cool, clean and I only replace it once a week (three hens).  We got our first egg today!!!!  

 

 

 

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

And no, the chicken ladder is NOT as steep as it looks in these photos.  LOL!  It's an illusion.  They use it well.  And sorry for the repetition from the first post.  I should have re-read the OP before spilling all the details again.  Let's chalk it up to a long week.  


Edited by UTAHEM - 9/25/15 at 10:21pm
post #5 of 6

I'd be most concerned about the lack of ventilation in the little coop...and crowding....and how will you keep your water thawed in winter.

How many bird do you have?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Three birds and like I said the whole top of the little coop is open and we will run extension cords to hear water.
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