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When/Do Rooster Hormones "Level Out"? - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Yeah rooster and small kids dont mix sadly. Ours was just mislabled as a pullet. So he was just a pet mostly no really purpuse for us as well. Ours had just started growing his so he was quickly becoming more dangerous.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesusfreak101 View Post

Yeah rooster and small kids dont mix sadly. Ours was just mislabled as a pullet. So he was just a pet mostly no really purpuse for us as well. Ours had just started growing his so he was quickly becoming more dangerous.

That definitely is not true all the time, that roosters and children do not mix.

Roosters may not lay eggs, but they are just as important and special as the hens are.

 

   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
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   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
Reply
post #13 of 15
I said small kids i speaking of toddlers and yes they are important to the survival of chickens but rooster no matter how sweet can be unpredictable. And from other flock owners when i was facing my rooster problem said that they were to dangerous to have around small kids. My daughter is two and poses no threat she was walking away from the hens when he attacked her for no reason. It would have been different if she was hurting a hen or chasing them but she doesnt do either. She feeds them treats and food along with helping with water and other things. He should not have seen her as a threat but he did. Whether he was being what he was or not was not the point he was a danger to my child safety and she comes first. After hearing how small kids have lost their eyes because of a rooster attack or they were hurt severally i dont believe it a risk anyone should take with a small/young child that cant protect themselves.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesusfreak101 View Post

I said small kids i speaking of toddlers and yes they are important to the survival of chickens but rooster no matter how sweet can be unpredictable. And from other flock owners when i was facing my rooster problem said that they were to dangerous to have around small kids. My daughter is two and poses no threat she was walking away from the hens when he attacked her for no reason. It would have been different if she was hurting a hen or chasing them but she doesnt do either. She feeds them treats and food along with helping with water and other things. He should not have seen her as a threat but he did. Whether he was being what he was or not was not the point he was a danger to my child safety and she comes first. After hearing how small kids have lost their eyes because of a rooster attack or they were hurt severally i dont believe it a risk anyone should take with a small/young child that cant protect themselves.

You did the right thing in gettting rid of that rooster. There are plenty of nice roosters around that will protect the flock and not be human aggressive. You are wise in waiting until your little one is older. Wait... do I remember correctly that you are expecting, also? (Congrats, if I am remembering right!) You will have enough on your plate taking care of two small children without having to worry about an aggressive rooster to boot. There is nothing wrong with eating a rooster you can't keep. 

 

ETA - Sometimes it's just not practical to keep every bird that comes along, either. If one is limited with the amount of chickens they are allowed to have and are counting on the eggs, it may be necessary to get rid of an unexpected rooster and replace it with a pullet. Sometimes that means putting him in the freezer or under the rose bush. It's not always easy to give a rooster away, and often times when you do, the rooster is going to be eaten anyway. After all, you can ask that he live a long, happy life on the idyllic little farm, but the reality is, if it's not a productive bird, it'll probably end up on the table. Once it leaves your place you have no say as to what its future will be. 


Edited by bobbi-j - 9/27/15 at 7:51pm

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

Reply
post #15 of 15
Yup i am this time its a little boy!! His due date is dec 15 we see if i last that long lol. Yeah i was sad about getting rid of him but to be honest now i feel much better not having to worry about my daughter getting attacked or next year when i have my infant son outside with us worrying about the rooster attacking either of them while i work in the garden. If you have to be concerned about you kids being attacked while your outside with them and or not then then that animal needs to go. We had a husky that was great with my daughter he would try to change her diapers and comfort her if she cried. He later became agressive over human food were he would turn around and bite me if i wouldnt let him get the food off the table he was rehomed to a couple with out kids that could take the time not only to work with him but they didnt have to worry about a toddler(lucy was about to turn one at the time) getting bit. We now have two dogs that adore her and are not food aggressive. The bigger one doser still lets her try to rid him and bounce on him and dress him up and pull on him he doesnt care what she does and blue however shy he is he lets her get away with alot as well. When she would get in to things she wasnt suppose to and doser was closer to her then i was he would take the item away and bring it to me and when she would go some where she should he would gentle grab her arm and lead her back to were she was suppose to be. I am thankful that we got these two dogs and i would say the same about a rooster if i could trust him but thats not going to be the case. I able to train and have worked around large animals (bulls, studs, horses (gelded) and large dogs) i am not new to animals just birds but i wouldnt let my daughter around certian animals i knew were aggressive.
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