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Help determining genders

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hi,
I'm considering purchasing an Americana chick, about 3 weeks old. I would like to pick out a hen, but I don't know how to tell if it's a rooster or a hen. Tips would be awesome smile.png thanks ūüźď‚̧ԳŹ
post #2 of 8
The comb will be larger on the male...they will even be a bit bigger the the females...also they seem to be bolder...first to the treats...the male fathers might be starting to show...longer around the base of the neck and just before the tail...they carry their tail at a higher angle...and their stance is more upright..even at that age...
post #3 of 8

On an ameraucana (unless you're being sold an EE as an "americana") you'll see a single pea comb for a pullet, triple pea comb for a cockerel:

This one has some good pictures:
http://www.homegrowngourmet.org/how-to-know-before-they-crow-gender-identification-in-young-chickens/

My EE were harder to get a good look at the comb, but I have 4 pullets.

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippychicken View Post

Hi,
I'm considering purchasing an Americana chick, about 3 weeks old. I would like to pick out a hen, but I don't know how to tell if it's a rooster or a hen. Tips would be awesome smile.png thanks ūüźď‚̧ԳŹ

Unless you are paying a lot of money for it and (or) buying it from a private breeder, you will be purchasing an Easter Egger chick rather than a true Ameraucana chick. Hatcheries and feed stores (and the farmers who buy from them often and incorrectly market their Easter Eggers as Ameraucanas when they are in fact EEs. It's not going to be easy to sex them at 3 weeks as they will not be fully feathered and their combs will not be very developed yet, but some things you can look for are more pointed upright tail feathers, reddish  or orange feathers in the neck, back, and especially the shoulder area (the sure sign of a male), and the development of three rows of peas in the comb (females typically have only a single row of peas). Female EEs in the majority of cases will develop a partridge looking black and brown feather pattern (similar to a duckwing pattern), but of course there are exceptions. Again though , three weeks is very young to try and sex them. 

post #5 of 8

agree with Michael

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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info!! It's much appreciated smile.png
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippychicken View Post

Thanks for all the info!! It's much appreciated smile.png


You're welcome.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael OShay View Post
 

Unless you are paying a lot of money for it and (or) buying it from a private breeder, you will be purchasing an Easter Egger chick rather than a true Ameraucana chick. Hatcheries and feed stores (and the farmers who buy from them often and incorrectly market their Easter Eggers as Ameraucanas when they are in fact EEs. It's not going to be easy to sex them at 3 weeks as they will not be fully feathered and their combs will not be very developed yet, but some things you can look for are more pointed upright tail feathers, reddish  or orange feathers in the neck, back, and especially the shoulder area (the sure sign of a male), and the development of three rows of peas in the comb (females typically have only a single row of peas). Female EEs in the majority of cases will develop a partridge looking black and brown feather pattern (similar to a duckwing pattern), but of course there are exceptions. Again though , three weeks is very young to try and sex them. 

I agree, too.

Breeder of Dutch bantams, Wyandotte bantams, and a few exhibition rabbits.

Feel free to ask me questions about chicken and rabbit care, breeds, and showing! I'm always happy to help!

 

"All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts."

--William Shakespeare

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Breeder of Dutch bantams, Wyandotte bantams, and a few exhibition rabbits.

Feel free to ask me questions about chicken and rabbit care, breeds, and showing! I'm always happy to help!

 

"All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts."

--William Shakespeare

Reply
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