New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

are the eggs ok

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So I noticed that I was not getting the amount of green eggs that I knew I should. I have big run but four still get out and run around which idc lol. Anyway this morning I just kinda followed them around and I found there nest of five eggs. My question is are they good its only been two maybe three days of the shortage?
Rocky Brook Farm on facebook
Reply
Rocky Brook Farm on facebook
Reply
post #2 of 7

Do a float test.  If the eggs drop to the bottom and do not stand on end, you know they are fresh.  Of course when in doubt, crack them into a bowl, and do an inspection and nose test before eating them.  

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thank you that's exactly what ill do. It was a nice find lol.
Rocky Brook Farm on facebook
Reply
Rocky Brook Farm on facebook
Reply
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ken77 View Post

Thank you that's exactly what ill do. It was a nice find lol.


I found a nest of about 17 green eggs when I had 5 EE hens.  All but two of the eggs were good.  We ate them with no problems.  I estimated the nest of eggs to be about a week and a half old.  I recently confined my flock because they were laying out in the field, the bushes, on top of the rabbit cages, etc. You get the idea.  This morning, I collected 3 eggs out of 8 layers with two on the nest in my smaller coop.  The little stinkers have been hiding them really well!

 

I still have five hens on the loose.  I'll have to work on catching them too.

Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
post #5 of 7

2-3 days in your climate, temperature wise, they should be fine....unless they were dirty and wet.

 

Float test will tell you how much fluid has evaporated from egg, thus maybe how old it is......

...but break eggs one at a time in separate cup and give it a good look and sniff before adding to pan or recipe.


Edited by aart - 11/25/15 at 5:01am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Here we go again. So this time its been five days lol. It took that long to find lol. But this time it got in the 20s at night. If they froze then they are bad right? I have not taking the eggs yet. Should I mark the ones there and leave them then only get unmarked ones each day? I don't want to keep haven to Easter egg hunt every day lol it is fun lol. Any thoughts? It's only four chickens that get out of the big run and they are some my favorites lol.
Rocky Brook Farm on facebook
Reply
Rocky Brook Farm on facebook
Reply
post #7 of 7

If the shell hasn't cracked from freezing, they are fine to eat.

 

Lock the birds in the coop and secure your run so they can't get out again.  

 

Free range birds sometimes need to be 'trained'(or re-trained) to lay in the coop nests, especially new layers.

Leaving them locked in the coop for 2-3 days can help 'home' them to lay in the coop nests.

They can be confined to coop 24/7 for a few days to a week, or confine them at least until mid to late afternoon.

You help them create a new habit and they will usually stick with it. ..at least for a good while, then repeat as necessary.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock