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How to know if its an easter egger?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
My broody hatched a load of chicks last week. 2 came from blue eggs, 4 from brown eggs and one from a bantam. I know which chick is the bantam, but have no idea which of the other chicks came from the blue eggs. I can't even tell the other chicks apart as they all look similar. Is there anything to look out for as they grow to indicate if any of them might have the blue gene - either cockerals or pullets. With the girls I guess I'll find out eventually but it would be nice to have some idea before.

Just talked to the farmer and he says he's got a black Minorca cock that could be the father.
post #2 of 8

Typical EE traits (but not always):

- green or slate blue legs

- pea comb

- beard

- wild type genome (colored like a chipmunk as a chick)

 

The wild genome is recessive, so if it is mixed with an extended black it probably won't show in the chicks. 

Most of my EEs have green or slate blue legs which is the easiest trait to look for. 

All but one of my EEs have a pea comb. 

Beards are not as frequent in my EEs as the other traits mentioned, but it is a trait of the Ameracaunas they were bread from.

 

Hope this helps.

post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraken Farmer View Post
 

Typical EE traits (but not always):

- green or slate blue legs

- pea comb

- beard

- wild type genome (colored like a chipmunk as a chick)

 

The wild genome is recessive, so if it is mixed with an extended black it probably won't show in the chicks. 

Most of my EEs have green or slate blue legs which is the easiest trait to look for. 

All but one of my EEs have a pea comb. 

Beards are not as frequent in my EEs as the other traits mentioned, but it is a trait of the Ameracaunas they were bread from.

 

Hope this helps.


X2 on Kraken Farmer's post.

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by RachaelR32 View Post

My broody hatched a load of chicks last week. 2 came from blue eggs, 4 from brown eggs and one from a bantam. I know which chick is the bantam, but have no idea which of the other chicks came from the blue eggs. I can't even tell the other chicks apart as they all look similar. Is there anything to look out for as they grow to indicate if any of them might have the blue gene - either cockerals or pullets. With the girls I guess I'll find out eventually but it would be nice to have some idea before.

Just talked to the farmer and he says he's got a black Minorca cock that could be the father.

If the black cock is the sire all the chicks they may all look mostly black and similar.  The 4 that share the most characteristics or look mostly alike are probably from the 4 large fowl brown eggs.  The blue egg gene doesn't necessarily relate to any given phenotype.

http://ameraucanaalliance.org/faq.html#Seven

John W Blehm  Creator of several varieties of Ameraucana chickens.

Join the Ameraucana Alliance.  Membership starts at just $10/year. 

http://Ameraucana.org  -  http://AmeraucanaAlliance.org  -  http://Ameraucana.club

Reply

John W Blehm  Creator of several varieties of Ameraucana chickens.

Join the Ameraucana Alliance.  Membership starts at just $10/year. 

http://Ameraucana.org  -  http://AmeraucanaAlliance.org  -  http://Ameraucana.club

Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FowlStuff View Post

If the black cock is the sire all the chicks they may all look mostly black and similar.  The 4 that share the most characteristics or look mostly alike are probably from the 4 large fowl brown eggs.  The blue egg gene doesn't necessarily relate to any given phenotype.
http://ameraucanaalliance.org/faq.html#Seven

Of the 6 black/mostly black 5 look similar and only one different. One is all black with grey sort of coloured legs. The other 5 have various amounts of yellow on their chest/wing tips, black legs with pink toes. The only wild type was a bantam which was from a white egg.

Would I be able to tell a pea comb at this age?

5 like this


1 like this
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraken Farmer View Post

Typical EE traits (but not always):
- green or slate blue legs
- pea comb
- beard
- wild type genome (colored like a chipmunk as a chick)

The wild genome is recessive, so if it is mixed with an extended black it probably won't show in the chicks. 
Most of my EEs have green or slate blue legs which is the easiest trait to look for. 
All but one of my EEs have a pea comb. 
Beards are not as frequent in my EEs as the other traits mentioned, but it is a trait of the Ameracaunas they were bread from.

Hope this helps.

Thanks. I will have to ask the farmer what breed his blue eggs came from. I'm looking at the cream legbar and that only has a single comb and blue eggs so if its those he's got that might effect what I'm looking for.
post #7 of 8

It this stage, the differences between pea combs and single combs are subtle. A single comb should already have tiny little 'spikes.' A pea comb will be a small, slightly lumpy ridge. Coloring isn't going to be an indication since the father was a solid black rooster, all the chicks will likely be solid black.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

It this stage, the differences between pea combs and single combs are subtle. A single comb should already have tiny little 'spikes.' A pea comb will be a small, slightly lumpy ridge. Coloring isn't going to be an indication since the father was a solid black rooster, all the chicks will likely be solid black.


X2 on junebuggena's post.

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