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brooder in unheated garage in winter with heat lamp... yay or nay? - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

You can brood in the garage, it’s much better than in the house from a dust, noise, and possible smell standpoint. The more isolated they are the less likely you are to handle them.



This is my brooder built into the coop. It has a plywood top that is a droppings board but the bottom and sides are hardware cloth. In the summer it’s kept pretty open but in the winter when it can be below freezing the sides are wrapped pretty tightly with plastic. I drape the plastic to the ground to stop drafts and put a “floor” in the heated end to help keep the heat in. I have used a piece of plywood but wound up with a plastic floor tray for a dog crate and use that now. I only heat one end and don’t put a floor in the far end. Some mornings there is ice in the far end but the heated end stays toasty. There is enough ventilation up high by my imperfect fit of that plastic wrap so the ammonia can escape, plus if it stays dry there just isn’t any ammonia generated. Since it is heated frostbite isn’t an issue.

One of the problems you face brooding outside or even in your unheated garage is that the daily highs and lows can vary quite a bit. It’s really difficult to maintain a constant temperature. With a large brooder that’s not an issue at all. Just keep one end warm enough at the coldest temperatures, maybe even a bit too warm. Keep the far end cool enough in the warmest temperatures. Even straight out of the incubator mine are really good at self-regulating temperature themselves. Your goal is to give them a place to warm up when they need to but also give them a place to cool off if they need to.

There are all kinds of ways to provide that warm spot. I use heat lamps, others use heating pads, ceramic heaters or emitters, maybe a hover, just all kinds of ways. A hover is a shallow inverted box set up just high enough for the chicks to go under. It traps their body heat plus you normally provide a low level of heat in really cold weather so they can stay warm. Like the heating pad cave, people are often surprised to see them spend more time on top of it than under it. They really can handle the cold pretty well.

You mentioned it gets in the 20’s. Water can freeze at that temperature. I suspect that is outside temperature, not what you are seeing in your garage so it’s irrelevant. It’s what is in your garage that’s important. Yes, when you open the door to take your car in or out, assuming you do that, it’s not likely to get cold enough in there for water to freeze. Still, for those brooding where it is below freezing around the brooder, and that might be you, think about how you keep water thawed. I just use a shallow bowl filled with rocks to keep them from drowning when they walk in it (they will walk in it) and set that in the warm zone. Not directly under the heat but close enough so that it doesn’t freeze. With some other methods you may need to do something special to keep the water thawed. People do it all the time in their coops in winter s it’s just something to think about.

Good luck!

We actually do not park in our garage. I store my lawn mower and its a workshop mostly. It is conbected to the house but I dont mind walking the two feet to my car. I have small gravity waterers and feeders for my brooders. i even have the ones I use for my run the spring/summer with the nipples. Looks like drafts Re my biggest issue over the cold. The dust was so terrible last time and I really rather avoid it. If they are in the garage I can easily put some bedding in a tub and bring them inside for a bit for my kids to snuggle on them. The more we handle them the friendlier they seem to be. Even my rooster isn't aggresove towards us. (Now its hit or miss with my husbamd but he didnt spend time torturing him with lovins like the kids and I did.) Lots of great information. Thanks guys!
post #12 of 18

Ok what about my situation.....?

 

I live in southern Michigan so obviously it gets cold here.

 

I own this brooder:

 

 

http://www.gqfmfg.com/brooders/0534-universal-box-brooder/

 

 

I will not be using this in the house.  Not happening.  I do have a pole barn across the street (totally uninsulated, not heated, however it is completely draft free).  GQF told me the outside air temp in that pole barn shouldn't be any colder than 60 but I think that's garbage....especially using a brooder as nice as this one is.  Now, obviously I'll have it off the floor.  I was thinking of making a type of box (4 walls and a top) out of thin wood to place over top of it like a cover during the colder weather for additional insulation....maybe drill a few holes on top for ventilation.

 

Does this sound like it will work?

post #13 of 18
As I am sure it could work in the summer but chicks need at least 80-85 degrees but it's a nice good set up the only thing I would worry about is the temp is there any way u could add additional heat source for them in the winter
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithKZ View Post

Ok what about my situation.....?

I live in southern Michigan so obviously it gets cold here.

I own this brooder:


http://www.gqfmfg.com/brooders/0534-universal-box-brooder/


I will not be using this in the house.  Not happening.  I do have a pole barn across the street (totally uninsulated, not heated, however it is completely draft free).  GQF told me the outside air temp in that pole barn shouldn't be any colder than 60 but I think that's garbage....especially using a brooder as nice as this one is.  Now, obviously I'll have it off the floor.  I was thinking of making a type of box (4 walls and a top) out of thin wood to place over top of it like a cover during the colder weather for additional insulation....maybe drill a few holes on top for ventilation.

Does this sound like it will work?
When are you brooding and how many? Chicks will quickly out grow those after two weeks. I brood in a homemade brooder box with a suspected heat lamp. I wait until May or June so temperatures aren't that big of a worry. I brood out in a shed, I don't think the shed is a problem. The brooder might be, I've seen them, they can be confining and you might end up with pecking problems. Chicks need heat but also need fresh air and good ventilation.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #15 of 18

Oh I'm sorry....I left out a very important fact:  I'm raising QUAIL....not chickens in this.  I am going to brood 9 jumbo brown quail (yes I realize this isn't the quail forum) that will hatch this weekend....just using them for practice....1st time.  I will be getting some more exotic ones in a couple of weeks so the temps will be warmer and not an issue.  I don't plan on brooding again until August and will do so through February...then nothing again until the next August.  I will mainly be brooding regular coturnix (small) quail that I will be using for dog training.  So no, I won't have any crowding issues....that brooder is huge...especially for quail.


Edited by KeithKZ - 4/18/16 at 10:52am
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithKZ View Post

Oh I'm sorry....I left out a very important fact:  I'm raising QUAIL....not chickens in this.
Big difference, disregard my previous answer. I know nothing of quail so I can't help.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #17 of 18

That shouldn't matter....we're still talking about brooding chicks in the winter in northern climates.

post #18 of 18
Well I'm unfamiliar with the temperature that they are brooded at. I also have turkeys and brooding them is different than chickens.

I'll give my educated guesses. The shed should be fine as long as the brooder holds the temperature you want it to. I would raise it off the floor to avoid drafts and rodents, but I wouldn't totally enclose it as birds need fresh air and can smother without enough, you could use wire for security on the top to have good air exchange. I might put up two or three sides to block drafts. That's what I might do. Than tweak things as needed.

Different external temperatures will affect brooding. We have pole sheds, they are hot in summer, so no heat might be needed in warmer months.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
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