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The Graze Craze!

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

What up flockstars!?  So, after seeing my flock decimate the cover crop I planted for them as well as digging at the roots of everything and anything I had planted out there for my own enjoyment, I've decided to start doing a crop rotation of sorts.  The local farmer cover crop mix worked well for the most part so I'll probably stick with that (peas, bell beans, vetch, barley, the inevitable clover that sneaks in from everywhere).  

 

But... I'm on the coast, like right on the edge of the pacific ocean.  The biggest problem I think has been the salt in the air, the exposure to sun and wind (the ladies are well protected).  So any suggestions on what y'all plant?  Particularly anyone who has a flock right on the edge of the coast.  My grow zone is 9b.

 

Also...  What do you plant for you enjoyment on the coast?  So far jasmine has really been the only thing to really do well (the vining jasmine that has no fragrance).  I also have rosemary, sage, and lavender and it's alive but just not thriving and HUGE which would be nice.

 

Thanks for any input :)

post #2 of 3

Applies to your thread title rather than the post content.

 

 

http://www.thegardencoop.com/blog/2012/02/07/grazing-frames-backyard-chickens/

 

1/2" hardware cloth for grass-like leaved plants(sod and grains)

1 x 2" fencing for larger leaved plants.

When fresh planting seed I stack a second frame on top until roots are established or they pull the whole plant out.

 

I like the one at the top best and am converting the others over.

Ripped a half inch off the 2x4's and used it to cover mesh edges to avoid cut feet and subsequent infection (bumblefoot).

 

 

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 


awesome, thanks for the reply.  i do use a sprouting system (in protected trays) to be able to give them some fresh greens.  i just have a really large area out back (2 areas actually) that i need to plant something that grows in this coastal climate (9b) and the chickens will enjoy, and i guess if they tear it up through the season that will be fine because of my plan to rotate them between the two areas.

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