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Extremely high incidence of blood spots and/or meat spots in eggs.

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
I have asked this question in several locations now (locally), but I thought I would try my hand here.
The eggs from my layers (some 2 years old, some 1 year old) have a ridiculously high percentage of blood spots or meat spots in them.
Nearly every egg. Most of these are small.
These girls are happy hens (or certainly seem to be!). They free range three seasons of the year and are in a a well-protected coop in our barn in the winter.
They are fed All Flock (plus oyster shell on the side).
This issue seemed to begin last summer, though at first, it was more sporadic, and only involved my (now) 2 year old layers. The pullets were not yet laying.
The only thing I can figure is that our farm well (the one they used to be watered from) contained elevated levels of sodium and chloride. As soon as we discovered this, we switched their water supply. I know that excess sodium can affect the kidneys, but I don't know if that would affect egg quality so much as egg production. I don't see any other signs of kidney problems with the girls (diarrhea, lethargy, etc.). They lay at the expected rate for their individual breeds (we have several).
Any thoughts?
Has anyone else experienced this?
I pick out the spots, and eat the eggs, but it makes me hesitant to pass eggs on to friends/family, knowing that so many of them will have spots.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give!
Aileen

Us: 1 Mama, 1 Papa, and 3 Sons

The Fur Children: Gus, Kate, and Peanut

 

The Girls: Leah, Poulette, Grace, Pearl, Pinga, Little Pinga, 

Cherry, Teddy, Statue, Quail and Football

 

The Rooster: Pillow

 

 

 

 

 

Reply

Us: 1 Mama, 1 Papa, and 3 Sons

The Fur Children: Gus, Kate, and Peanut

 

The Girls: Leah, Poulette, Grace, Pearl, Pinga, Little Pinga, 

Cherry, Teddy, Statue, Quail and Football

 

The Rooster: Pillow

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
post #2 of 2
http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publications/1/egg-quality-handbook/

Check blood spots and meat spots. Maybe something will ring a bell.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
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