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A few cocci questions

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hi there,

I've searched a ton of threads, sorry to start a new one on an old, common topic.

Received chicks in the mail today. One looked very lethargic, and after sitting with them for about an hour, she pooped blood. I was immediately in action, scooped up the blood in the bedding with my hands while the other chicks dived at it (they did eat some). Washed hands, made another brooder to separate her.

Instantly ran the necessary errands, and got the sulmet, along with plain yogurt. Over the last two hours I've been giving her drops of the now-medicated water and brushing the yogurt on her beak, which she eats up. She's now chirping away and walking around.

Questions:

1.) can the sulmet be mixed with the probiotics and electrolytes in the water (I did not do this to err on the side of caution until I could ask)
2.) I read that once there is blood, the intestinal damage is done and no saving it. Is this true?
3.) the others ate blood, though I'm assuming they already have it. Thoughts on how to proceed? They have clean poop, right now, and are acting very healthy. I did put sulmet in their water as well, though, along with a tiny bowl of a tablespoon of yogurt for them to pick at.
4.) anything I've missed?

Thank you so much in advance.

Edit: one last judgment call question: these are from Greenfire, they guarantee chicks for 72 hours. Should I email them just in case right now? Or just wait it out.
Edited by Clearly - 3/2/16 at 12:00pm
post #2 of 8

I'm dealing with a coccidiosis outbreak too. My vet recommended using Corid...found at most farm stores/feed stores. Cocci are contagious and so if one has it, I would expect the others will too. Wash your brooder (if possible) daily, the feeder and water, and change out the shavings often. Coccidiosis can be fatal so leaving it be may not be the best option. I've lost two already. My vet also recommended that I get separate water containers. 1 for the corid and 1 for any thing else I might like to use like ACV and electrolytes.

4 Buff Orpingtons

Dum spiro, spero - while I breathe, I hope

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4 Buff Orpingtons

Dum spiro, spero - while I breathe, I hope

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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
It's horrible!!!! You're all excited with you new chicks and *BAM*, patient zero!

Really great suggestion on the water feeders. I'll do that right away! I was worried mixing could affect the medication, which is priority. I'll be cleaning like crazy, washing hands all the time, and making sure it's dry.

I just hope it's not true that once there is blood, it's over for the chick. I only ordered six because they're crazy expensive. This was my spring splurge, bringing in rare birds at a high price point. Would just make losing them even worse, past the heartbreak of it all!

Sigh!

Just went in to check on her and she was lying on her back with her head in the water. Not fully covering it, she didn't drown, but it's not looking good. I rolled her over and she's breathing, but .... Man, this is depressing!
post #4 of 8

It's a very pitiful sight! I would expect that your chick will probably be gone within the hour. At least her suffering will be over!

4 Buff Orpingtons

Dum spiro, spero - while I breathe, I hope

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4 Buff Orpingtons

Dum spiro, spero - while I breathe, I hope

Reply
post #5 of 8

Not true that seeing blood means there's no hope, they can still recover but treatment must be started asap.  It's always best to have meds on hand for that reason.  However I would get Corid (amprolium) rather then sulmet.  There are at least 9 strains of cocci and Corid treats more of them then Sulmet.  Sulmet can also be very harsh on their intestines, not something chicks need on top of the coccidiosis.  Also, do not give yogurt or other diary while treating.  It coats the intestine and may hinder the action of the Corid, wait until after treatment.

 

Make sure your sick chick stays warm and give her the medication with an eye dropper or small needless syringe as she will not be drinking enough on her own.

 

As for separate water containers... the medicated water should be the ONLY source of water during treatment or your birds are not going to get the correct dose.  After treatment you can go back to using electrolytes or vitamins if desired but during treatment they should only be getting the medicated water with nothing else added.  And yes, you should go ahead and treat them all. 

 

Edited to add:  It's really not necessary to wash and change your brooder every day.  Yes, it needs to be kept reasonably clean and certainly dry.  However, exposure is key to developing their own resistance.  You will never get rid of all the protozoa and there's plenty more outside when they move into their coop.  They need the opportunity to develop resistance.   You just need to be familiar with the early signs of coccidiosis and be ready to treat right away. 


Edited by cafarmgirl - 3/2/16 at 1:42pm
wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much for all that information!!!! Really great responses!

She did pass away, despite setting her up with her own heat lamp. I was giving her water with the meds mixed in, but I think she was just too far gone. The mail was a day late, post office screwed up, and I can't help but wonder if they had arrive on time, it could have been caught. As for the others, they seem happy as can be and no blood. I'm keeping them on the water, but will go out first thing in the morning for Corid. I don't think my co-op carried it, they led me straight to sulmet, so I will call around.

What a huge bummer, but I have high hopes for the others at this point. They're playing around like normal chicks, so the hope is that it was early enough for them that they'll be okay.

Can't thank you guys enough for the support I received here, and on other threads when I've gone into panic over something. We are so lucky to have this community!
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
One follow up question here, the last of them in regards to this:

When do I stop giving them the medicated water? The other six are acting perfectly healthy still. It's been 32 hours since the sick girl was separated, 26 since she died. The have fresh bedding.

Thanks!
post #8 of 8

I would use the medicated water for a total of 5 days.  All you are doing with any type of coccidiostat, including amprolium, is starving out the cocci protozoa so it can't overgrow. So if any of your other birds did happen to be carrying around a growing load of them it will simply keep things from getting out of hand.  The older and stronger they get as well as the more exposure they get, especially by going outside, the better their resistance will be.

wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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