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Vaccinating chicks and then introducing them to a broody hen?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

There are several broody hens in our coop, and we may be getting a few more chicks. I figured that we would buy some chicks from either Meyers or Cackle, and have them vaccinated. How long do I need to quarantine them? And is it for their sake, or for our former flock's sake? I understand that people allow their chicks to interact with their flock all the time, if their hens are brooding the chicks. But  have no idea if it safe to do so, if I have the chicks vaccinated so recently?

 

Our flock have come from both Meyers and Cackle, and all were vaccinated for Marek's. Could they be carriers of Marek's because the have the vaccination, and then give it to the chicks who have not received the immunity quite yet? or could the chicks give Marek's to the hens and roosters?

 

I have also generally heard not to introduce the chicks  to adults because they lack a certain immunity, but people have been doing it for generations upon generations. Of course, with some casualties, but maybe we are over complicating things just a little?

 

And, if I waited to introduce them to a broody hen once they are 1-14 days old, would an extremely broody hen still accept them?

post #2 of 8

If you have hatchery vaccinated chickens, and they were never exposed to Marek's disease, all will be well.  If by chance your flock has been infected with Marek's, then new chicks need two to three weeks isolated from all contact so they have time to build immunity.  It's a trade- off, and likely you will be fine because your flock isn't infected.  Brody hens are very individual, but very unlikely to bond with older chicks.  My flock includes both vaccinated (hatchery) chickens, and unvaccinated birds raised here by broody hens.  I'm extremely careful about biosecurity, and necropsy every bird who dies, so have avoided this disease.  Mary

post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allisha View Post

There are several broody hens in our coop, and we may be getting a few more chicks. I figured that we would buy some chicks from either Meyers or Cackle, and have them vaccinated. How long do I need to quarantine them? And is it for their sake, or for our former flock's sake? I understand that people allow their chicks to interact with their flock all the time, if their hens are brooding the chicks. But  have no idea if it safe to do so, if I have the chicks vaccinated so recently?

Our flock have come from both Meyers and Cackle, and all were vaccinated for Marek's. Could they be carriers of Marek's because the have the vaccination, and then give it to the chicks who have not received the immunity quite yet? or could the chicks give Marek's to the hens and roosters?

I have also generally heard not to introduce the chicks  to adults because they lack a certain immunity, but people have been doing it for generations upon generations. Of course, with some casualties, but maybe we are over complicating things just a little?

And, if I waited to introduce them to a broody hen once they are 1-14 days old, would an extremely broody hen still accept them?

one point to understand is although the vaccine is a live vaccine IT IS NOT LIVE WITH THE MAREKS VIRUS. people often get that confused. As I understand it, immunity is achieved by using a virus derived from turkey's. However it is important to note the vaccine is NOT the MAREKS VIRUS. so as I understand not being the Mareks virus itself it would NOT spread Marek's from a vaccinated chick to un vaccinated chick. I like to give my chicks 3 to 4 weeks or longer if possible to build up immunity before exposure. exposure would consist of being out doors and around other birds. I do this because the vaccine DOES take some time for antibodies to be produced. immunity is NOT instant. it's very wise for you to bring this up because most people don't consider the time it does take to develop the antibodies. I hope this helps best wishes.
post #4 of 8

Exactly, it is not wise to vaccinate the chicks and immediately move them with the adults, the virus is everywhere so there has to be some time for the chicks to develop antibodies for the virus, it usually takes 2 weeks (minimum) but longer would be best.. Chicks have to be isolated completely, I mean changing clothes and shoes, wash hands and cover your hair every time you go to see them. It is a lot of work but it has to be done properly or vaccination is wasted. 

loving my flock with their personalities, getting to know them and enjoy everyday I spend with them
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loving my flock with their personalities, getting to know them and enjoy everyday I spend with them
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Interesting!

I know I am bringing this up again, but so my understanding is that when you vaccinate chicks for Mareks, unvaccinated chicks will NOT get Mareks from the recently vaccinated chicks?

So it is safe for me to vaccinate the chicks, and then put them back in with the broody hen, BUT if there is Mareks in the coop, the chicks will catch it because the lack of immunity?

post #6 of 8

Vaccinated chicks need to be isolated from sources of infection for a couple of weeks to respond to the vaccine.  It's not instant!  Mary

post #7 of 8

Chicks can not spread the disease once they are vaccinated.  If the coop had Mareks in it you would know.  If all the rest of the flock is from hatchery and vaccinated I see no problem.  We are not talking ICU here.  Aldraite has gone way beyond the necessarily steps to keep the chicks safe.  Just by handling them we are exposing them to all kinds of toxins and viruses.  Chicks are a lot hardy then we give the credit for.   Introduceing them after just a few days old is risky.  The broody may or may not accept them.  This is true if you hatched them from your own eggs.   It is trial and error.  You just have to do what you feel is best.

I live in Northeastern New Mexico. Live on a 2.5 acres with my husband of 38 yrs.(husband pass away 6/13/16), 2 dogs, 2 cats,    I have SLC, Blue laced Red Wy, Partridge Cochin, Blue, Black & White Cochins, Americanas, Cuckoo Marans Roo, Dominque Roo,  Blue Bar Roo, Buff Orps, Lavender Wy, Black & Blue French Cooper Marans, French Wheaton Marans, Cuckoo Marans , Dominque , Blue bar  Whiting...

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I live in Northeastern New Mexico. Live on a 2.5 acres with my husband of 38 yrs.(husband pass away 6/13/16), 2 dogs, 2 cats,    I have SLC, Blue laced Red Wy, Partridge Cochin, Blue, Black & White Cochins, Americanas, Cuckoo Marans Roo, Dominque Roo,  Blue Bar Roo, Buff Orps, Lavender Wy, Black & Blue French Cooper Marans, French Wheaton Marans, Cuckoo Marans , Dominque , Blue bar  Whiting...

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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Alright! Thanks for all the comments!

I am not too concerned with the illnesses the chicks could get, I was just concerned that the chicks could give the adults mareks because of the freshness of the vaccine, but I realized that the vaccine doesn't work like that, so no worries there.

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