New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

head pecking

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I have a bantam rooster and a Wynedotte hen and a Buff Orpington hen.  I noticed a raw spot developing on the back of the Orpington's neck.  It was getting steadily worse so I bought meds to place on the spot.  It now seems to be not getting worse although the feathers have not grown back yet. 

 

Now I am seeing a bare spot appearing on the back of the Wynedotte's neck.  I am assuming this is from the rooster.  Do I need to separate the rooster from these hens?  What else needs to be done?

 

Thanks,

DrCB

post #2 of 5
Roosters do that when they're mating. It may just be that there arent enough hens for him. I found a good link for you http://www.mypetchicken.com/backyard-chickens/chicken-help/Our-rooster-is-pecking-the-backs-and-heads-of-two-H237.aspx
post #3 of 5

A roo can handle at least 10 girls, so over-mating is highly likely with just 2 girls. That said, he will likely have favourites even if you got lots of additional hens. Probably separating him from the girls will help in the short term.

 

CT

Nairobi, Kenya
Reply
Nairobi, Kenya
Reply
post #4 of 5

Might have more to do with technique rather than 'over mating' or male:female ratio.

 

I believe that the oft cited 1:10 ratio is from fertility efficiency in a commercial breeding setting.

Many breeders use pairs, trios, quads, etc.

 

Age can be a variable too, younger cockerels just learning the ropes can be much more clumsy and/or aggressive.

Some cockerels are best kept separate until they mature further.

 

Might have to do with a bantam trying to hold onto a large fowl.....he probably can't 'reach' anyway.

Wounds needs to be watched and/or treated so infection doesn't occur.

Assessment of if a male is needed for flock goals and/or if this male is needed.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the comments and links.

 

DrCB

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock