New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How high is too high

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I build a chicken coop (work in progress) for my children's pet bantam chickens.  Because of space restrictions I built a two storey coop each floor is 600 mm High, 900 mm Wide and 900 mm Deep, so all together it's 1200mm high.  I am thinking of buying two standard size chickens (Australorps).

 

The coop is seating on the ground and I am planning in building two nest boxes on each floor hanging of the walls and lifting the coop up off the ground by another 600 mm, chicken access to the inside will be via doors from the outside one on each floor.

So my question is...will the top floor door be too high at 1200 mm off the ground?

post #2 of 6
Pictures would help. I do not know bantams, but Australorps can fly a little.
1200mm converts to just over 3ft, my birds easily fly up about 6/7 ft. So no not too high.
If any have problems you could build them a ramp.
post #3 of 6

What type of bantams are they? If you are talking silkies due to the fact that they have fluff as apposed to real feathers They can't fly very much. Now Polish and other bantam breeds from what I know because they are small and light can fly quite far. I have Silkies, Barred Rocks (Soon), Gold SL, And a Polish crested (Soon). But I've read about polish and silkies, Plus a friend has polish so from what I know bantams can fly quite a bit.

Three duck; Albert, Martha, and Lily

Seven Chickens; Almonzo, Clover, Amelia, Rosemary, Laura,

Juliet, and Caroline

R.I.P Clara

5/11/2016

&

Laura

5/17/2016

Happiness is animals

Reply

Three duck; Albert, Martha, and Lily

Seven Chickens; Almonzo, Clover, Amelia, Rosemary, Laura,

Juliet, and Caroline

R.I.P Clara

5/11/2016

&

Laura

5/17/2016

Happiness is animals

Reply
post #4 of 6

If the upper opening is 3ft high (didn't convert, just going by other response conversion), I would add a ladder or ramp if you're looking at full sized australorps.  Yes, they could make it up there.  But they're heavier birds, and it might be hard on their legs getting down...especially as they age (my older gals don't move like spring chickens any more).  Ramps are simple - tack on some scrap shingle material for good grippage - and easy to spray off if ever needed.

Caretaker of a lovely mixed flock including: australorp, plymouth rocks, wyandotte, d'uccles, silkies, EEs, andalusian, and a few seramas, plus a golden retriever, great dane, and three cats.  I always swore that I wouldn't succumb to chicken math.  I lied.
 

Reply

Caretaker of a lovely mixed flock including: australorp, plymouth rocks, wyandotte, d'uccles, silkies, EEs, andalusian, and a few seramas, plus a golden retriever, great dane, and three cats.  I always swore that I wouldn't succumb to chicken math.  I lied.
 

Reply
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your response. I am new one in the forum and novice with chickens. I have two Pekin bantam size chickens.

I live in Brisbane (Sunny Queensland , Australia) where the weather is subtropical, mild winters, so my chickens are really free range and coop will only be used for sleeping.  The nest boxes will be hanging from outside so as to make the most of the space (not much for 2 standard size Australorps) but being free range I supposed it should be OK.  Thanks again to every one.

post #6 of 6

Height of roost can depend on width of coop...they need room to fly down without crashing into something.

Roost should be higher than nests.....or they will sleep (and poop) in nests.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: