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Rooster Mating Behavior!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello :frow

 

I have 2 separate coops (1 standard, 1 bantam) right next to each other. All of my chickens are between the ages of 4 months and 2 months (not at egg laying age yet). I have 1 standard size RIR roo and 2 bantam D'Uccle roos.

 

Lately I've been noticing EVERY MORNING and often times randomly throughout the day my roosters will chase their favorite hens and attempt forcing their head down (looks pretty violent to me). The hens do NOT appreciate this and make loud sounds while trying to get away. I've researched this behavior a bit and found that they are in fact trying to mate the girls, but they're going about it all wrong and I feel terrible for the ladies! The roos aren't doing the 'dance' and the girls are not submitting to them. Is this normal? Will they eventually learn how to be more gentlemanly about it? Or do I just have rude little chicken rapists on my hands? Help!

post #2 of 7
Think of it as the morning wood for roosters.
Here's a video showing a rooster chasing chickens...and...well...you'll see. Video is bought to you by isabrown. lol.png



Btw, I don't condone the feeding of chips to a chicken. especially salted ones.
Edited by Steamdemon - 5/18/16 at 10:08am
Chickens: Sybil (Rhode Rock), Tosca (Blue Bell) and Letty (Light Sussex).
Hamster: Natsu.
Reply
Chickens: Sybil (Rhode Rock), Tosca (Blue Bell) and Letty (Light Sussex).
Hamster: Natsu.
Reply
post #3 of 7
If my roosters exhibit that behavior at that age I round them up and separate them out for a few months until they mature a bit and stop acting so forceful, and foolish. I have a separation pen that was built just for this reason. Not all roosters do it but at least half seem to get over vigorous and over dominating. Some are separated for a few months others can go almost a year before I need them and reintroduce them. Mine are always penned where they can see the flock and can interact through the wire. I will occasionally let them out to see if their behavior has improved, otherwise they go back to the pen for some more time. Most eventually improve and become more respected, those that don't are culled. I always try to give my roosters until a year old before I judge their final temperament.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

If my roosters exhibit that behavior at that age I round them up and separate them out for a few months until they mature a bit and stop acting so forceful, and foolish. I have a separation pen that was built just for this reason. Not all roosters do it but at least half seem to get over vigorous and over dominating. Some are separated for a few months others can go almost a year before I need them and reintroduce them. Mine are always penned where they can see the flock and can interact through the wire. I will occasionally let them out to see if their behavior has improved, otherwise they go back to the pen for some more time. Most eventually improve and become more respected, those that don't are culled. I always try to give my roosters until a year old before I judge their final temperament.

 

Is it bad if I keep them all together?

I really don't have a place to keep the roos separated :hu

post #5 of 7
You can keep them together, this is just what I do, I don't separate them all just some, but I have the room and am adding new roosters every few years.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by shalynnbrothers View Post
 

 

Is it bad if I keep them all together?

I really don't have a place to keep the roos separated :hu

While it may be unsettling for you, it's completely normal behavior for your chickens. The main issue is stress. If you don't have enough girls to spread out the attention, or you don't have enough room for the girls to properly evade the boys, they will all be way too stressed out. 

That kind of behavior is also one big reason why it's generally not a good idea for those new to chickens to keep cockerels. It's best to have some mature hens around to keep those teenage boys in-line, and teach them manners.

post #7 of 7
My 2 month old naked neck roo has been crowing for about 3 weeks now and the hen keeps attacking him but today he is dominating the hen he mounted her she sat down her self I heard that's rare at that age but he's not to fiesty I mean he doesn't pull feathers out and I clipped his nail about half it was sharp he's a good one when he grows
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