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Chick feeder hole size.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
How small/big do holes in a feeder need to be for chicks, from hatchlings up to 8 weeks, to fit their heads in but keep the adults and older chicks out?
Edited by NysiaAnera - 10/31/16 at 5:47am
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 
Oh, no! I was going to sacrifice one of my pumpkins just so I could enter this contest, but we had to go into town, and I totally forgot!! My chickens LOVE pumpkins!! Oh well, maybe next year?

At any rate, I put together a collage of just *some* of the damage my chickens did in my squash patch. The goats tore down the garden fence and the chickens devoured 24 pumpkins, and around 18-22 other squashes, and then the goats ate the rinds. I lost over half my squash harvest to them.

Enjoy!


And yes, the one picture is a pumpkin stem, the entire thing was gone!
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
How in the world did that post end up in this thread??? Crazy!
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by NysiaAnera View Post

How small/big do holes in a feeder need to be for chicks, from hatchlings up to 8 weeks, to fit their heads in but keep the adults and older chicks out?


Not sure how one would successfully achieve that. If you can create a place of refuge for the chicks, and keep their food and water in that place, that might work. I made (but have yet to use) something of this nature. Basically, i built a "table" and then added vertical strips of wood all around. The idea being that the chicks can get through the gaps, but the mature chickens cannot. As I say, its just an idea that i had - not yet tested. 

"The whole problem of the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell
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"The whole problem of the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKen View Post


Not sure how one would successfully achieve that. If you can create a place of refuge for the chicks, and keep their food and water in that place, that might work. I made (but have yet to use) something of this nature. Basically, i built a "table" and then added vertical strips of wood all around. The idea being that the chicks can get through the gaps, but the mature chickens cannot. As I say, its just an idea that i had - not yet tested. 

That is a good idea, I think it would work great!

I had an idea for a feeder for the chicks just like the ones for adult birds, that use a container and pvc pipe elbows, so they stick their heads in to eat the food. It might not actually work for chicks, but I figured it was worth a try.
post #6 of 10

Nothing ventured, nothing gained! I'd suggest trying whatever ideas you feel suit your situation best.

"The whole problem of the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell
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"The whole problem of the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell
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post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yep! I figure it is worth a shot. I will have to post pictures of what I come up with.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Okay, took a little bit to get everything figured out and finished in our busy lives, but I now have two functional chick feeders. I didn't get a picture of the chicks using them yet, but they love them! I have one for younger chicks, and one for older chicks.



The holes in this one are 1-1/4 in.



The top bucket has a hole in the bottom for feed to drop through.



The bottom bucket has an upside-down dog bowl on a piece of wood to push the feed to the edges and keep too much food from coming down all at once. All secured with screws so nothing moves.



View from inside.



The holes in this one are 2 inch. The rest is put together exactly the same way.
Edited by NysiaAnera - 12/13/16 at 7:45pm
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Also, we did not use pvc elbows because they are difficult to attach securely. Our large chicken feeder fell apart and we had to completely redo it so it would stay together. Too much work and hassle for these little ones.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
And here is a picture of them outside.

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