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Feed Marigolds to Chickens for Darker Yolk Color... - Page 3

post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by CovenantCreek 

If it's lutein that makes the most difference, then tomatoes should work as well.


I think there are many sources of lutein that would darken yolks - spinach, alfalfa, tomatoes, etc.

"Marigold (Tagetes erecta L., Asteraceae) is not only grown as an ornamental, cut flower, and landscape plant, but also as a source of pigment for poultry feed. The pigment is added to intensify the yellow color of egg yolks and broiler skin. It is composed of esters of xanthophyll (lutein). Finely ground blossom meal, often enriched with an extract, or the extract itself, usually saponified for better absorption, is added to the feed. Marigolds are grown for this purpose in various locations in the western hemisphere, primarily in Mexico and Peru, by and for various companies who produce feed additives."Horticulture, Purdue University

Without processing, I can't see why a chicken would eat a Tagetes flower. However with tomatoes, alfalfa, spinach, etc. - we know that they will eat them and benefit.

Steve

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post #22 of 30

old.....this is also a the derrivitve that is used in head lice human treatments.   So, I started thinking......when my marigolds were still yellow, but sort of spent I gathered up a bunch and spread them in with my shavings...........made the coop smell nice and seems to keep bugs away.

The perithium that is (spelling?!)


Edited by junebug7334 - 1/17/09 at 7:56am
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post #23 of 30

I bought some Calendula seeds to plant out by the coop. I hope the chickens like them smile.

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post #24 of 30

I think we are drifting into very unknown waters here.

First of all, anyone can edit Wikipedia. The industry probably does not use Calendula in poultry feed.

I think using Tagetes by the commercial feed industry is one of those examples of where we don't really want to follow the industry's example.

The source for pyrethrum or any pyrethroid insecticide is not the garden marigold.

Finally, here's what the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, UCDavis  says about Tagetes:

"Dermatitis: The juice, sap, or thorns of these plants may cause a skin rash or irritation. Wash the affected area of skin with soap and water as soon as possible after contact. The rashes may be very serious and painful. Call the Poison Control Center or your doctor if symptoms appear following contact with the plants."

I take back my statement that either marigold is fine especially when we are drifting into these ideas about insecticides from other, unrelated species!!

Steve

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post #25 of 30

I did some research and concluded this:

Calendula petals are edible, so the worst thing that can happen is nothing.

Also, Calendula petals contain carotenoids.

Third, Carotenoids are what gives egg yolk their color.

Therefore: Feeding chickens Calendula flowers or any other safe fruit or vegetable (Spinach, Alfalfa, Peaches, Carrots, Chard, Tomatoes, etc. ) should improve and darken egg yolk color.

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post #26 of 30

I think you are correct.  It's mums not marigolds.  That'w what I get for not having my coffee.   Anyway, it's only what I do in my coop,,,,,,,,,,,not suggesting anyone else should do it.

digitS' :

I think we are drifting into very unknown waters here.

First of all, anyone can edit Wikipedia. The industry probably does not use Calendula in poultry feed.

I think using Tagetes by the commercial feed industry is one of those examples of where we don't really want to follow the industry's example.

The source for pyrethrum or any pyrethroid insecticide is not the garden marigold.

Finally, here's what the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, UCDavis  says about Tagetes:

"Dermatitis: The juice, sap, or thorns of these plants may cause a skin rash or irritation. Wash the affected area of skin with soap and water as soon as possible after contact. The rashes may be very serious and painful. Call the Poison Control Center or your doctor if symptoms appear following contact with the plants."

I take back my statement that either marigold is fine especially when we are drifting into these ideas about insecticides from other, unrelated species!!

Steve

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post #27 of 30

Having more than a bit of experience with all types of marigolds, I would not give these to chickens as food. However, they will keep all the bugs away that you would want the chickens to eat if they are free ranging. When sown directly into the soil, they present themselves completely different in smell than when you purchase a flat or six pack at the nursery. Some of these are just god awful smelling and I wouldn't want my hens walking around in the stuff. They will like the seed pods though as these are very tasty to just about every animal that tries them. The seeds do have some very good medicinal purposes when not given the choice of traditional ointments. I would grab some seeds and chew them real quick and put them on a stinger while in the middle of nowhere. I have grown every variety of marigold from all over the world while living in various parts of the world. Have even 'kiped' a few in the wild to try.  The only good use they have imho, is they do a fine job of keeping nematodes away from certain night shade veggies. However, I sometimes could taste the chemical they dispersed in the soil in the veggies themselves. So, I don't even use them for that purpose anymore.
IMHO, I would never want this around my chickens.

La Donna
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La Donna
1 husband, 1 son 23, 2 Whelsh springer spaniels, 60+ chickens
addicted to gardening, education specialist 

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post #28 of 30

Hi there! I've just remembered something my grandmother told me about marigolds---she was born in the 1880's, bore 10 living children and lived very frugally in the country all her life.  She said she could rememberwhen farmer's wives coloured their butter with marigold petals to give it a better  colour---they did this especially in the winter when the milk wasn't so good. She worked on farms when she was a very young girl and helped with the dairy work.

I'm a Brit. Living near Oxford UK, eccentric, sometimes grumpy, passionate about books, food/wine, gardening, "Button" my cat & my chickens:  3 Miniature White Rocks, 10 Dorkings, 2 Andalusian x White Rock, 3 Dorking x White Rocks.
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I'm a Brit. Living near Oxford UK, eccentric, sometimes grumpy, passionate about books, food/wine, gardening, "Button" my cat & my chickens:  3 Miniature White Rocks, 10 Dorkings, 2 Andalusian x White Rock, 3 Dorking x White Rocks.
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post #29 of 30

First, I can't imagine why anyone would need to darken their yolks any...mine are extremely orange as it is!  Any darker and they will be blood red!  tongue

Second, I will tell you this.  I grew both Calendula and the Tagetes this year, the calendula to add to my salves and lip balms and the Tagetes for companion planting with my garden to ward off bugs.

After the garden was done, the chooks were allowed in to clean up the veggies and bugs.  They never touched the Tagetes, not one leaf~which isn't surprising since they have a pungent odor and a sharp taste.  They stripped my calendula down to the ground within a few days~blossoms and all.

Chickens will decide what they like to eat and what they don't, so I wouldn't worry too much about feeding one or the other to your chicks, as they usually pick and choose what they like anyway!  wink

post #30 of 30

,,,,,,,,,,,


Edited by North Briton - 1/26/09 at 8:55am
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