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How long can I leave chicks in the incubator?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

This is my second time incubating the first time DH kept opening the lid causing humidity problems and we had a bad hatch. This time I refused to open it at all.
     My first chick hatched at 9:05 on Saturday day 20 More hatched yesterday. I am at 13 of 36 right now though with some pipped some working there way around and some I can tell started there way around and are now dead! I don't know why this happened.
      The humidity was 82 % last night with two plugs out and I had a chick stuck next to the egg carton his wing was under it he had been there all day and couldn't get out so I lifted the edge just enough to move him out and even though my humidity didnt drop the chick I had been watching move around the egg hatching died.  Just stopped moving his beak stuck behind the membrane. So I am afraid to open it at all again.
         My question is how long can I leave those chicks in there waiting for the rest to hatch? I have pips some that just pipped last night or this morning.
     Why are they so far apart on hatching?
     It is a little Giant Still air. My humidity is currintly 79% and my temp is 101.7

sorry its so long
Melissa

4 dogs, 3 cats, 1 little banty hen, 15 ducks (anacona, muscovy, pekin, and Rouen ducks, Royal purple, coral blue, and Opaline Guinea fowl, lots of big rabbits, a miniature horse, a guinea pig , married to the only man who could put up with me and all my critters.
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4 dogs, 3 cats, 1 little banty hen, 15 ducks (anacona, muscovy, pekin, and Rouen ducks, Royal purple, coral blue, and Opaline Guinea fowl, lots of big rabbits, a miniature horse, a guinea pig , married to the only man who could put up with me and all my critters.
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post #2 of 9

With a still air, a prolonged hatch is fairly common.  Different areas of the bator are at different temps and humidity.  This is why I always recommend forced air.

I remove chicks at 48 hours from first hatchling.  Before I open the stryobator I have a misting bottle with warm(100 degree) water ready.  As soon as the last dry chick is out I mist the inside of the bator and close the lid quickly.  This only if there are more left to hatch.

Matt

Foothills Poultry since 2003

 

- Standards: White Rocks and SQ Black Cochins
- Bantams: BCLB/CLB Dutch, Calico Pet Project, and lots of Pets

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Foothills Poultry since 2003

 

- Standards: White Rocks and SQ Black Cochins
- Bantams: BCLB/CLB Dutch, Calico Pet Project, and lots of Pets

Reply
post #3 of 9

If I HAVE to open the bator..  I make sure there are no pips..  It does not seem to harm the non-pipped eggs as much..

My bator comes back to homidity on it's own within 5 minutes, however..

I still do not make it a practice to open the bator, though..

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt A NC 

With a still air, a prolonged hatch is fairly common.  Different areas of the bator are at different temps and humidity.  This is why I always recommend forced air.

I remove chicks at 48 hours from first hatchling.  Before I open the stryobator I have a misting bottle with warm(100 degree) water ready.  As soon as the last dry chick is out I mist the inside of the bator and close the lid quickly.  This only if there are more left to hatch.

Matt


do they have to be left in for 48 hours? Or can you take them out once they are dry?

Chelsea
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Chelsea
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post #5 of 9

You can take the out once they are dry but I dont recomend that. I have left them in the bator for almost 4 full days. It doesnt hurt them at all.

post #6 of 9

why don't you recommend it? What will happen?

Chelsea
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Chelsea
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post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by cms1113 

why don't you recommend it? What will happen?


Nothing will happen to the chicks. But dry air hitting eggs that are pipping and or getting ready to hatch isnt good for them. You can use the bottle of warm water to mist the eggs if you do but its still not as good as leaving the bator shut.


Edited by B. Saffles Farms - 4/20/09 at 1:14pm
post #8 of 9

If I HAVE to open the bator..  I make sure there are no pips..  It does not seem to harm the non-pipped eggs as much..


I found the complete opposite to be true.  I only open after as many eggs as possible have pipped.  The ones that haven't pipped end up suffocating if the membrane dries because they can't position to pip or break the membrane.  The ones that have cleanly pipped survive just fine even if they get stuck cause they have a breathing hole. 

Make sure your humidity gauge is correct.  You can calibrate it by putting it in a ziplock or other small tightly sealed back with some damp salt.  The humidity should eventually say 75%.  Usually people say within 12hrs but it can depend what size bag you use and how much salt.  I had one continue to raise more than 24hrs later before reading only 1% off.  If the humidity really is that high I don't see why you'd have problems and I probably would not add any water after opening since mine hatch fine down to 65% humidity.  If I do need the humidity boosted quickly after opening and it's not at much risk of going too high I throw in warm wet paper towels.  It usually holds it an extra 5% higher after opening than if I'd done nothing.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akane 

If I HAVE to open the bator..  I make sure there are no pips..  It does not seem to harm the non-pipped eggs as much..


I found the complete opposite to be true.  I only open after as many eggs as possible have pipped.  The ones that haven't pipped end up suffocating if the membrane dries because they can't position to pip or break the membrane.  The ones that have cleanly pipped survive just fine even if they get stuck cause they have a breathing hole. 

Make sure your humidity gauge is correct.  You can calibrate it by putting it in a ziplock or other small tightly sealed back with some damp salt.  The humidity should eventually say 75%.  Usually people say within 12hrs but it can depend what size bag you use and how much salt.  I had one continue to raise more than 24hrs later before reading only 1% off.  If the humidity really is that high I don't see why you'd have problems and I probably would not add any water after opening since mine hatch fine down to 65% humidity.  If I do need the humidity boosted quickly after opening and it's not at much risk of going too high I throw in warm wet paper towels.  It usually holds it an extra 5% higher after opening than if I'd done nothing.


please do not do this to me..  take my whole post , not just part of it if you are going to call me wrong..

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