BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › Avian Lymphoid Leukosis-Not good news!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Avian Lymphoid Leukosis-Not good news! - Page 2

post #11 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by EweSheep 

Carla will not be selling any from her own flock as the last time I got an email from her. Her hens are getting old and they dont lay well at this point but beautiful lawn ornaments!

However Julie Gabbard has some of her lines in her flock and they are beautiful. If you still want to focus on CarlaTX lines,  you can go to Julie for more eggs.

Another Spitz breeder which most of her lines were from various hatcheries, is Carla from OK and her birds are beautiful too and very vigourous in her chicks. I had very high rates of hatchablity in her eggs and I thought she put in some Miracle-Gro in their feeds LOL!

Those three breeders I would highly recommend, LLV or not.


You know, Carla, in Okalahoma is who I got the eggs from that produced these birds I have.  I had forgotten that.  I had an excellent hatch of very healthy babies. 

Thanks for the info and the reassurance too!


Edited by Patchesnposies - 9/15/09 at 2:06pm

Married to my best friend, Mother of six, Adoption Advocate, Critter Collector, Goat Milker, Chicken Wrangler and Diligent Seeker.....QUILTING keeps me SANE!

Serama, Silkie, Egyptian Fayoumi, Blue Copper Marans and Golden Cuckoo Marans

 

 

Reply

Married to my best friend, Mother of six, Adoption Advocate, Critter Collector, Goat Milker, Chicken Wrangler and Diligent Seeker.....QUILTING keeps me SANE!

Serama, Silkie, Egyptian Fayoumi, Blue Copper Marans and Golden Cuckoo Marans

 

 

Reply
post #12 of 48
Thread Starter 

What about the eggs from the carriers/exposed birds???
Ok to eat?
or not?
Not 'hatching eggs', but 'eating eggs' from carriers/exposed birds............


Edited by gabby3535 - 9/15/09 at 2:28pm
My happy little flock...
2 Light Sussex hens, 3 black Ameraucans, 1 splash Ameraucana, 1 blue Ameraucana,
1 Black Copper Marans, & 1 pink-egg-layin' EE......
Reply
My happy little flock...
2 Light Sussex hens, 3 black Ameraucans, 1 splash Ameraucana, 1 blue Ameraucana,
1 Black Copper Marans, & 1 pink-egg-layin' EE......
Reply
post #13 of 48

Gabby, I am so sorry you have lost so many birds..

This is the post I wrote for the Spitzhauben Yahoo group.  It explains most of what I learned from my vet, who is an expert in poulltry diseases.

It is with a sad heart that I found out my entire Spitzhauben flock are Lymphoid
Leukosis carriers. Two of my birds have already died of the disease which was
confirmed by necropsy and blood tests.

There are two types of Lymphoid Leukosis viruses. One is only transmitted
vertically, that is it passes from the mom to the egg. It will not spread to
other chicks unless they are in the same hatch as the affected birds. The other
is the "J" virus. It can spread through the egg as well as horizontally to
other birds through feces, contact, etc. My Spitz do not have the "J" virus.

If a chicken has LLV, it may develop lymphoid tumors and die. There is no cure.
If it is only a carrier, it could live a long life and never develop tumors. A
lot of my Spitz are pushing seven years old and are fine and healthy.

Do your Spitzhaubens have LLV ? Probably, but you won't know unless blood tests
are performed or a necropsy reveals the tumors. I said probably because LLV
almost always shows up in "fancy" breeds with a limited gene pool that have been
bred within that gene pool for several years (per Texas A&M vet).

You can look up Lymphoid (or Avian) Leukosis on-line and it will give you lots
of information. What I have stated above are the basics and come from extensive
conversations with an avian disease expert (vet) who works exclusively with
chickens. He has written several articles for books and magazines.

Where we Spitz breeders go from here is another matter. I cannot with a clear
conscience sell birds or eggs knowing that they have the virus. However, if all
of our Spitz flocks have it, we are not exposing other Spitz breeders to the
disease.

Having your birds tested for the disease is up to you, but I would want to
know... One friend has already tested a Spitz and it was positive.

You do not have to test all the birds. I tested all my roosters first and they
were positive. Then I tested any other Spitz that needed to go to the vet or
died. You could also test a sample of your oldest and youngest hens.


I will be glad to answer any specific questions based on what I learned.

I see no reason why you can't eat the eggs.  It has never been an issue with anything I have read or heard.

Carla
Reply
Carla
Reply
post #14 of 48

To the OP- how is it going? How has your flock been? I'm very sorry about your losses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by allen wranch 

Gabby, I am so sorry you have lost so many birds..

This is the post I wrote for the Spitzhauben Yahoo group.  It explains most of what I learned from my vet, who is an expert in poulltry diseases.

It is with a sad heart that I found out my entire Spitzhauben flock are Lymphoid
Leukosis carriers. Two of my birds have already died of the disease which was
confirmed by necropsy and blood tests.

There are two types of Lymphoid Leukosis viruses. One is only transmitted
vertically, that is it passes from the mom to the egg. It will not spread to
other chicks unless they are in the same hatch as the affected birds. The other
is the "J" virus. It can spread through the egg as well as horizontally to
other birds through feces, contact, etc. My Spitz do not have the "J" virus.

If a chicken has LLV, it may develop lymphoid tumors and die. There is no cure.
If it is only a carrier, it could live a long life and never develop tumors. A
lot of my Spitz are pushing seven years old and are fine and healthy.

Do your Spitzhaubens have LLV ? Probably, but you won't know unless blood tests
are performed or a necropsy reveals the tumors. I said probably because LLV
almost always shows up in "fancy" breeds with a limited gene pool that have been
bred within that gene pool for several years (per Texas A&M vet).

You can look up Lymphoid (or Avian) Leukosis on-line and it will give you lots
of information. What I have stated above are the basics and come from extensive
conversations with an avian disease expert (vet) who works exclusively with
chickens. He has written several articles for books and magazines.

Where we Spitz breeders go from here is another matter. I cannot with a clear
conscience sell birds or eggs knowing that they have the virus. However, if all
of our Spitz flocks have it, we are not exposing other Spitz breeders to the
disease.

Having your birds tested for the disease is up to you, but I would want to
know... One friend has already tested a Spitz and it was positive.

You do not have to test all the birds. I tested all my roosters first and they
were positive. Then I tested any other Spitz that needed to go to the vet or
died. You could also test a sample of your oldest and youngest hens.


I will be glad to answer any specific questions based on what I learned.

I see no reason why you can't eat the eggs.  It has never been an issue with anything I have read or heard.


I guess the question I have is whether breeders will share whether their birds have the disease. I hatched a pair of Spitz around the time this thread was posted and I'm at a loss- I got mine from Gabbard. Are they likely carriers? What does this mean for the other 30 birds I raised with them until now? I'm stunned that there isn't more discussion of this!

               ৲(⎠    ~Renée~ *MyHints* NPIP&AI 48-0346 Incubation Cheat Sheet ~t~ SickPage ~f~

 (`-.     _.-⎠̸   I dream of a society in which no one questions a chicken's motive for road crossing. 

*` (_.}  ,' Orp~Ameraucanas~d'Uccle~Konza~Aubergine~Silkie~Banty Cochin~Marans~Rock~Pea

     _ . /       

      _/  \ _ O

 

Reply

               ৲(⎠    ~Renée~ *MyHints* NPIP&AI 48-0346 Incubation Cheat Sheet ~t~ SickPage ~f~

 (`-.     _.-⎠̸   I dream of a society in which no one questions a chicken's motive for road crossing. 

*` (_.}  ,' Orp~Ameraucanas~d'Uccle~Konza~Aubergine~Silkie~Banty Cochin~Marans~Rock~Pea

     _ . /       

      _/  \ _ O

 

Reply
post #15 of 48

I would like to know what other breeds might be effected? Also, why is it more common with birds with limited bloodlines?
Is the J type also common in the spithaubens (birds with limited genetics)?


Edited by fancbrd4me02 - 1/18/10 at 8:38pm
Currently selling Millie Fleur Cochin hatching eggs. Contact me for purchasing information.  Soon to be a preservationist of rare Icelandic Chickens! Read about them: http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=299038&p=1  NEW CRAZY EGG TRAIN http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=326027&p=1
Reply
Currently selling Millie Fleur Cochin hatching eggs. Contact me for purchasing information.  Soon to be a preservationist of rare Icelandic Chickens! Read about them: http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=299038&p=1  NEW CRAZY EGG TRAIN http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=326027&p=1
Reply
post #16 of 48

I guess the question I have is whether breeders will share whether their birds have the disease. I hatched a pair of Spitz around the time this thread was posted and I'm at a loss- I got mine from Gabbard. Are they likely carriers? What does this mean for the other 30 birds I raised with them until now? I'm stunned that there isn't more discussion of this!


It depends on the breeder if they share whether or not the birds carry the disease.  A responsible breeder will let you know.  Yes, your Spitz are likely carriers, but I would not worry about it unless they hatched in the same incubator as the other 30 birds.  Since the virus is carried through the egg, it is possible to infect other chicks in the hatch.  I have 13 Spitz hens.  Most are old (over 5 years) so it doesn't appear the virus is a problem for them.  I lost a Spitz hen this winter and did not have her necropsied, but it was in the teens when she died and she was an older bird.

I would like to know what other breeds might be effected? Also, why is it more common with birds with limited bloodlines?
Is the J type also common in the spithaubens (birds with limited genetics)?


I don't know what other breeds might be effected, but a friend had some Ameraucanas that were.  LLV is more common in birds with limited bloodlines because they are cross bred so much.  I have no idea if the J virus is common in the Spitzhaubens.  It is a little rarer, and mine don't have it.

Carla
Reply
Carla
Reply
post #17 of 48
Thread Starter 

Hi Renee........thanks for asking about the welfare of my little flock! (I am the OP of this thread.....)
Since the last death here (in Sept. '09) of A.L.L., everyone else has been just fine!
I certainly don't want to jinx myself, but everyone is happy, robust and healthy.
Soooooooooooo..............I have fingers crossed for their future.
Again, thanks for asking!!
I love my chickens!


Edited by gabby3535 - 1/21/10 at 5:48pm
My happy little flock...
2 Light Sussex hens, 3 black Ameraucans, 1 splash Ameraucana, 1 blue Ameraucana,
1 Black Copper Marans, & 1 pink-egg-layin' EE......
Reply
My happy little flock...
2 Light Sussex hens, 3 black Ameraucans, 1 splash Ameraucana, 1 blue Ameraucana,
1 Black Copper Marans, & 1 pink-egg-layin' EE......
Reply
post #18 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabby3535 

Well, my adventure in keeping chickens is rapidly coming to an end........................
Since I started with 4-5 week old pullets in May.........I have lost 5 birds, to "unknown causes"! One after the other.
Essentially they just started looking poorly, or standing off by themselves, all fluffed up.........and then dead the next time I saw them.


to the original poster, i have been trying to research LL and there really isn't much info. My americauna hen is doing exactly that, standing by herself all fluffed up for 2 days now. eating and drinking only a little and hasn't laid an egg in a while. can you tell me any more of their symptoms or did they die very soon after the standing and fluffed up stage ? thanks so much...

Garden designer, sewist, and firefighter's wife. 3 kids, 9 hens, and 1 amazing Great Pyrenees !

Reply

Garden designer, sewist, and firefighter's wife. 3 kids, 9 hens, and 1 amazing Great Pyrenees !

Reply
post #19 of 48

Not the original poster but...

When birds get sick, they do not like to show weakness, because the other birds will take advantage of them.  As a result, they may fluff themselves up to look bigger and less vulnerable.

Standing around fluffed up, eating and drinking less, a pale comb and wattles and decreased egg production can be signs of many illnesses. 

I hope your birds do not have LLV, but the only way to find out is from a blood test.

Carla
Reply
Carla
Reply
post #20 of 48

OK where could I get a blood test when there are no chicken docs here. There is one avian vet but they are outrageously expensive. Do you know what blood tests are supposed to run ? thanks so much

Garden designer, sewist, and firefighter's wife. 3 kids, 9 hens, and 1 amazing Great Pyrenees !

Reply

Garden designer, sewist, and firefighter's wife. 3 kids, 9 hens, and 1 amazing Great Pyrenees !

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › Avian Lymphoid Leukosis-Not good news!