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How do i cull a Rooster

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Could someone please tell me how to cull my Roosters nicely,  I have been told to chop their heads off or swing them by their heads, both are extremely distasteful to me.   I have heard that somehow you can gently break their necks without them realizing whats happening.   Makeing the process less distressful on both of us.

I have 20 Roosters and need to do something about my growing problem.

Mum to 7 Cats, 3 Dogs, 3 Cows and 44 Chickens and counting.
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Mum to 7 Cats, 3 Dogs, 3 Cows and 44 Chickens and counting.
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post #2 of 10

I always just stepped on their head and then quickly pulled up with their legs and then held them still on the ground while they bled out.

Former keeper of hens, life isn't much fun without chickens... but

 

"With God, ALL things are possible."

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Former keeper of hens, life isn't much fun without chickens... but

 

"With God, ALL things are possible."

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post #3 of 10

You can check out the Meat Bird forum for ideas....

I just hang mine up by the feet (slipknot loop tied to the tree), make sure they are relaxed, then quietly cut the veins in their throat. They bleed out, if you stand and watch, they seem to just fall asleep. After they "die" they will flop, but it's mainly just nerve stuff. Or, you can just do the cut and walk away smile

How to process chickens at home! A step by step pictorial on processing chickens at home without lots of tools.

~No one ever said you had to be perfect to be happy. ~

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How to process chickens at home! A step by step pictorial on processing chickens at home without lots of tools.

~No one ever said you had to be perfect to be happy. ~

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post #4 of 10

The axe is my preferred method.  While certainly it is more visual to the person doing the deed, it is quick and humane for the bird which is more important to me than whether I see a little blood or not.   Good luck.

Count the campfires by glowing flames, never by the ashes that fall. Count your days by the golden hours, don't remember clouds at all. Count the nights by stars, not by shadows. Count your life by smiles, not by tears. And with joy on every birthday, count your age by friends-not years.
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Count the campfires by glowing flames, never by the ashes that fall. Count your days by the golden hours, don't remember clouds at all. Count the nights by stars, not by shadows. Count your life by smiles, not by tears. And with joy on every birthday, count your age by friends-not years.
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post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highlander 

The axe is my preferred method.  While certainly it is more visual to the person doing the deed, it is quick and humane for the bird which is more important to me than whether I see a little blood or not.   Good luck.


Yes, I usually use the axe as well, and with it being razor sharp, I've never had to chop twice. I've also tried cutting the throat, but I do find the axe easier and quicker.

post #6 of 10

Here is a thread with a nice processing station.  Note the traffic cones, place bird in so it does not flop, and use a sharp knife to cut veins or cut head.

IMO least visual method..wink

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=75677
ON

"Nothing is lost, nothing is created ... all is transformed. Nothing is the prey of death. All is the prey of life."-- Antoine Béchamp

The "blues"  Ameraucana and Marans
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"Nothing is lost, nothing is created ... all is transformed. Nothing is the prey of death. All is the prey of life."-- Antoine Béchamp

The "blues"  Ameraucana and Marans
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post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks Guys,  I guess its like every thing the first time is the hardest.sad

I had hoped someone knew about the technique i was discribeing.

The Pictures were worth seeing, gives us an idea on how you can go about it.

Mum to 7 Cats, 3 Dogs, 3 Cows and 44 Chickens and counting.
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Mum to 7 Cats, 3 Dogs, 3 Cows and 44 Chickens and counting.
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post #8 of 10

If they have become pets to you and/or have names, I recommend against it or at least be ready for it to be extremely difficult mentally.  Going into it, I had a good idea that it was going to be rough to cull my head rooster, but it was a tad more difficult when the knife was finally ready to go.  So, just be sure you're ready.  A device I've seen to be very good is the Humane Dispatcher.  It just breaks the neck and there is no blood.  It's quick, easy, and humane (for both the chicken and the human who does the culling).

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks   TheMainException  "the Humane Dispatcher" you mention would this be using a broom stick?  I'm not sure how i came across it, but there is a lady on You Tube and she shows how to break the neck by laying a broom stick on the ground, putting the head under the stick, placing right boot on the broom stick and doing the same with the left as quickly as you can, then putting all your weight on it, then pulling gently, the neck actually gives way and breaks in half, without rupturing the skin and having blood everywhere.hmm

Its amazing how things move along on you, one moment i'm trying to find out the best way to do this and the next i'm forced into.

My head Rooster Le Roy is looking sick/very old, i did a post  asking for advice in the behavior section, found him the other day in the laying box's where he stayed for 2 days and 2 nights, he finally got out and has been outside last couple of days, and at night on the perch, but tonight he is back in one of the laying box's sound asleep.  I notice during the day he is huddled in corners sometimes on his own sometimes with the others,  Anyone got any ideas?sad

I really didn't think i had a problem with the other roosters, but on the 8th or 9th i went out and one of the young roosters is very much worse for ware, so i went looking for someone in simliar condition.  Found him, (no i hadn't tagged  him yet nor named him, ) so i followed him around and realized he wasn't letting up on this other rooster, so i resolved there and then he had to go, if he was the cause of Le Roy hiding in the laying box's well that just wasn't going to  happen anymore, and i couldn't have him beating up the other roosters to this extent.   

So thanks to everyone's posts and showing me how others do it, i got a large plastic bag and cut a hole in one corner, put him in it and popped his head out through the hole.  That had him contained and not flapping around on me.

And yes it was very quick and a lot more acceptable to me than the other options.  I believe it's the first time in 56 years that i have knowingly killed something.   and yes i have named most of the others!!hmm

Mum to 7 Cats, 3 Dogs, 3 Cows and 44 Chickens and counting.
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Mum to 7 Cats, 3 Dogs, 3 Cows and 44 Chickens and counting.
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post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMainException View Post
 

If they have become pets to you and/or have names, I recommend against it or at least be ready for it to be extremely difficult mentally.  Going into it, I had a good idea that it was going to be rough to cull my head rooster, but it was a tad more difficult when the knife was finally ready to go.  So, just be sure you're ready.  A device I've seen to be very good is the Humane Dispatcher.  It just breaks the neck and there is no blood.  It's quick, easy, and humane (for both the chicken and the human who does the culling).

I culled my first hen a month or so back. I was kind of ready for it but my stomach was doing flips and turns the whole time. Be sure to keep the axe/and or knife really sharp!

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