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Eating/Cooking with Goose Eggs? - Page 2

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathy Hopkins 

Never had a duck egg, but we love the goose eggs and our friends wait for them in the spring.  They are wonderfully rich and make the best bread pudding you ever ate!  We freeze ours and they keep up to about 6 months.  Blend them slightly first. Some people pour the egg in ice cube trays and count each cube as one egg, I usually buy extra large chicken eggs and my goose eggs equal 3-4 of those in volume.  The first year we did it, my husband wrote how many ounces were in each ziplock bag.  That didn't help me because I had no idea what the volume of an average chicken eggs was in ounces. hu   Now we put about how many chicken eggs are represented to humor me -as well as the volume.
They make the coolest hard-boiled eggs for easter eggs, too!  You should have seen my grandson's eyes when he found the first one of these! It was priceless!  ep


I think I know that look, I once showed up to a party (St. Patrick's day) with a platter of deviled goose eggs with quail eggs for constrast. I thought the goose eggs were too big as halves so I cut them in 1/4 and added some green food color in the yoke mixture in honor of the day. Since I knew a lot of the guests were "pepper heads" I just added red hot sauce to the quail yokes. 4 goose eggs with a doz quail eggs nicely filled my biggest platter and make a truly amazing sight. I had forgotten until last night's party when I was asked about them again so they made a real impression.

~gd  Backyard ducks and geese.
Amprolium medicated feed is SAFE for waterfowl! Your money, your waterfowl, your Choice.
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~gd  Backyard ducks and geese.
Amprolium medicated feed is SAFE for waterfowl! Your money, your waterfowl, your Choice.
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post #12 of 20

My grandmother (RIP) would do all of her Easter baking with duck and goose eggs. The cakes were very moist and rich. Breads were very dense and delicious.

Pretty Pony
26 horses, 2 Border Collies, 1 Border Rat, 1 Rottweiler, 2 English Bulldog, 1 Italian Greyhound, 2 mini-donkeys, 2 Amer Blue geese, 2 Sebastopoles,  18 Silver Laced Wynadottes, 1 African Gray parrot

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Pretty Pony
26 horses, 2 Border Collies, 1 Border Rat, 1 Rottweiler, 2 English Bulldog, 1 Italian Greyhound, 2 mini-donkeys, 2 Amer Blue geese, 2 Sebastopoles,  18 Silver Laced Wynadottes, 1 African Gray parrot

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post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathy Hopkins 

They are wonderfully rich and make the best bread pudding you ever ate!


Hi Kathy,
Do you have a recipe by chance? I have two goose eggs  I am going to cook with and like to use them to make bread pudding, thanks!

post #14 of 20

I have to try my goose eggs now, I've been wondering about eating them.

I don't know how to start a new topic so I apologise for butting in here. I have started a new Facebook page called "Honk If You Love Geese" and I'd love to have participation talking about our geese and sharing pics and stuff.

3 chickens (hens), 5 geese (3 Embdens, 2 Toulouse), 24 ducks (5 Calls, 7 Call/Runner babies, 9 Runners, 1 Golden Welsh Harlequin, 1 Swedish Blue/Runner cross, 1 Khaki Campbell).

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3 chickens (hens), 5 geese (3 Embdens, 2 Toulouse), 24 ducks (5 Calls, 7 Call/Runner babies, 9 Runners, 1 Golden Welsh Harlequin, 1 Swedish Blue/Runner cross, 1 Khaki Campbell).

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post #15 of 20

My son likes them the best.  They tend to be more fluffy when cooked up.

Brandi
We raise Black JG, RC RIR & RIW, EE, BCM, Golden Comets, Blue Andalusions, Crele & Silver Blue OEGB, Red Pyle & Lemon Blue MGB, Milli Fluer D Uccles, B/B/S F/S Cochin, Seramas, White Silkies & Showgirls, BWQ, Guineas,  Runner Ducks (Crested and Non),  African Geese, Golden Pheasants and German Shepherds.   NPIP  64-1281
http://www.evermoreranch.com
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Brandi
We raise Black JG, RC RIR & RIW, EE, BCM, Golden Comets, Blue Andalusions, Crele & Silver Blue OEGB, Red Pyle & Lemon Blue MGB, Milli Fluer D Uccles, B/B/S F/S Cochin, Seramas, White Silkies & Showgirls, BWQ, Guineas,  Runner Ducks (Crested and Non),  African Geese, Golden Pheasants and German Shepherds.   NPIP  64-1281
http://www.evermoreranch.com
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post #16 of 20

Would you share your recipe for bread pudding?  My husband and I got our first goose eggs from a friend and were looking for things to do with it.  I could only think of scrambled eggs but bread pudding sounds a lot more yummier!

post #17 of 20

I don't get to eat many of the goose eggs, but I've eaten enough of them to declare them the most delicious eggs of all. They smell so good while they are cooking.

 

Slightly off topic, I don't detect any fishy or "earthy" flavor in my duck eggs.  The duck eggs are virtually odorless. Perhaps it has something to do with what they are eating?

Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

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Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

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post #18 of 20

Hi, 

As a child my mom cooked with both duck and goose eggs.  She also made the most fabulous cakes and she swears that goose eggs make the best baked goods.  We also had chicken eggs that she could have used to bake with but preferred the goose eggs.  I presently have geese but have not eaten any of their eggs as we have been putting them in the incubator.  I can't seem to convince my daughter that she would like them to eat if she would just try them.  She keeps telling me that they are her babies and insists that we place them in the incubator.

Littledear

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Littledear

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post #19 of 20

frow.gif I eat and  cook with  both goose and duck eggs. Mine free range in day time, in a fenced  pasture when I am not reseeding (like now). The  yolks get darker and richer when they are. I read that the  duck eggs can taste strong if they are on a  pond and eat fish or  fish  food.Mine get unmedicated layer and  some  alphalfa/oat pellet and cat kibble for a  treat.  The whites are a little harder to beat, but are supposed to be preferred by  chefs.

Slave to an Arabian, 2 half Arabians, a donkey,2 rat terriers, a jack Russel terrie ,a cat. Purebred Penciled, & Gray   Runner ducks, Dutch Hookbill Ducks, Saxony Ducks and Mini-Silkie Ducks: Mini Shetland Geese, Brown Super Africans. All from Holderread stock.In the foothills of the Georgia Mountains.
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Slave to an Arabian, 2 half Arabians, a donkey,2 rat terriers, a jack Russel terrie ,a cat. Purebred Penciled, & Gray   Runner ducks, Dutch Hookbill Ducks, Saxony Ducks and Mini-Silkie Ducks: Mini Shetland Geese, Brown Super Africans. All from Holderread stock.In the foothills of the Georgia Mountains.
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post #20 of 20


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by goosedragon View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathy Hopkins 

Never had a duck egg, but we love the goose eggs and our friends wait for them in the spring.  They are wonderfully rich and make the best bread pudding you ever ate!  We freeze ours and they keep up to about 6 months.  Blend them slightly first. Some people pour the egg in ice cube trays and count each cube as one egg, I usually buy extra large chicken eggs and my goose eggs equal 3-4 of those in volume.  The first year we did it, my husband wrote how many ounces were in each ziplock bag.  That didn't help me because I had no idea what the volume of an average chicken eggs was in ounces. hu   Now we put about how many chicken eggs are represented to humor me -as well as the volume.
They make the coolest hard-boiled eggs for easter eggs, too!  You should have seen my grandson's eyes when he found the first one of these! It was priceless!  ep


I think I know that look, I once showed up to a party (St. Patrick's day) with a platter of deviled goose eggs with quail eggs for constrast. I thought the goose eggs were too big as halves so I cut them in 1/4 and added some green food color in the yoke mixture in honor of the day. Since I knew a lot of the guests were "pepper heads" I just added red hot sauce to the quail yokes. 4 goose eggs with a doz quail eggs nicely filled my biggest platter and make a truly amazing sight. I had forgotten until last night's party when I was asked about them again so they made a real impression.


That's a great Idea, gd!  I've made them into deviled eggs and they are pretty much a meal in themselves!  Great on a bed of greens and some colorful veggie garnish.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyanchicken Lady View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathy Hopkins 

They are wonderfully rich and make the best bread pudding you ever ate!


Hi Kathy,
Do you have a recipe by chance? I have two goose eggs  I am going to cook with and like to use them to make bread pudding, thanks!

 

This is the basic recipe I sent Kim.  I usually make an "Oh, my God!"-size batch and freeze what we don't eat.  I make it in a 13"x9" pyrex or corning ware dish.  I'm not known for heart-healthy cooking, either, so feel free to adjust accordingly! You can tell I don't cook from recipes much, too!

 

Preheat oven to 325

 

2 qts milk or half and half

1 loaf stale French or Italian bread, torn into small chunks

2/3 c sugar

2-3 goose eggs, slightly beaten

(This depends on what kind of goose they're coming from, Chinese lay smaller eggs than Toulouse or American Buffs.) 1 goose egg = 3-4 chicken eggs

4 TBSP butter

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1-2 c raisins (optional -It's also optional to soak them in a little rum or brandy, then drain them well.)

 

Place the bread in a buttered dish.

Mix together the milk or half and half, sugar, salt, nutmeg, and beaten eggs.

Pour over the bread.

Cut the butter into small bits and add to the mixture.

Bake 1 hour in a slow oven (or until a knfe inserted into the center comes out clean).

 

You can serve it warm or cold with thick cream or Hard Sauce.

 

Let me know how yours turns out.  It's mightily rich made with half and half.

 

Kathy

 

 

Now I'm amending this to add that I am not a fan of cinnamon.  If you like it, add some.  I have also found that a little cardamom adds a delicate flavor, especially if I add very thinly sliced apple or pear sprinkled with it to the recipe.  (There is a lot of Weird Science goes on in my kitchen.)  I also use heavy cream over it myself.  


 



Quote:
Originally Posted by kimkarnold View Post

Would you share your recipe for bread pudding?  My husband and I got our first goose eggs from a friend and were looking for things to do with it.  I could only think of scrambled eggs but bread pudding sounds a lot more yummier!


I sent you the recipe.  Thanks for asking.

 

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