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Think It's Time to Process - Page 2

post #11 of 19

A note on scalding. I use a propane turkey fryer and heat it for about 20 minutes. There is a specific scalding temperature recommended but I cannot remember what it is because I don't know how to use a thermometer tongue.png.

 

What you want is water a little too hot for you to put your hands in but not boiling. It is getting there when there is steam and tiny bubbles but no sign of boil. Too cool and you have to keep dipping your chicken. Too hot and it is harder than heck to pluck and the skin turns yellow as you've started the cooking process. Just right and it takes about 5-10 minutes to make your chicken naked as a Jaybird!

 

I am going to have to try the broom handle. Getting tired of not cutting cleanly off with the hatchet and having blood spray all over.

 

Good Luck,

Shawn

Give a man a fish and feed him for a day, teach him to fish and feed him for a lifetime.

 

Chicken- God's perpetual food source.

 

Producer of Heritage Tamwork Pork, the Bacon Pig, and Freedom Ranger Poultry

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Give a man a fish and feed him for a day, teach him to fish and feed him for a lifetime.

 

Chicken- God's perpetual food source.

 

Producer of Heritage Tamwork Pork, the Bacon Pig, and Freedom Ranger Poultry

Reply
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the tips! I have a crab cooker that I am going to scald in. I called a lady I have gave roosters to before and she is coming over Thursday to show me how to butcher the year old roo I am practicing on. She said that the best temp to scald that she has found is 143 degrees.Yaay! I have read the links on butchering and I think I have a pretty good idea on how I am going to do it.

 

I may be jumping the gun here, but most feed stores don't carry chicks anymore so I found one that had 12 Cornish left and I bought them today! Should be easier because the weather is warmer, as soon as they are feathered they are going outside!  My husband isn't too thrilled, but he puts up with me! Hope I can do this!

 

When you rest the meat do you keep them in water? I have some shrink wrap bags on the way for freezing.

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyotesmommy View Post

They hatched April 14th how big and how old should I keep them until we cull?

 

 A dual purpose breed will need to be around 14-20 weeks.  Just check the bird now and then by feeling the size of the leg/thigh/breast.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by loanwizard View Post

There is a specific scalding temperature recommended but I cannot remember what it is because I don't know how to use a thermometer tongue.png.

 

 

140-150*, leaning towards the upper end, 148ish.  Like was said, you'll find tiny bubble around the bottom, not even a simmer.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by angelbabyamy View Post

When you rest the meat do you keep them in water? I have some shrink wrap bags on the way for freezing.

 Nope, just put them in your plastic bag and put them in the refridgerator.  I let mine sit for two days and gave the leg a pinch now and then to see if it had softened up.

 

Good luck,

Deb

The difference between breakfast and chicks, is the temperature you use to "cook" the eggs!

 

What breeds do I have?  More than any sane person would own.

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The difference between breakfast and chicks, is the temperature you use to "cook" the eggs!

 

What breeds do I have?  More than any sane person would own.

Reply
post #14 of 19

I did my first ever bird two days ago. Having heard how bad plucking was, I was worried about that part as much as any.  I got the water (for scalding) to the temp of "whoa, that's hot!" - didn't outright burn my fingers, but I didn't want to leave them in there either - LOL! (big thermometer wasn't working)  I swished the bird around in the water (in a turkey fryer pot) for about 1min, and checked the wing tip feathers a few times through the process.  When they came out easy, I pulled the bird out and immediately cooled it a little in another bucket of water.  Then, I commenced with the plucking.  The feathers just slid right off like butter.  I was VERY pleased with how easily the plucking went.
 

post #15 of 19

I have learned a couple things here. 1st, it never occurred to me to dip a freshly scalded bird into cold water before plucking.

 

And.... I didn't know you could rest a bird out of water in plastic...

 

Thanks all for a thread that just keeps giving!

Give a man a fish and feed him for a day, teach him to fish and feed him for a lifetime.

 

Chicken- God's perpetual food source.

 

Producer of Heritage Tamwork Pork, the Bacon Pig, and Freedom Ranger Poultry

Reply

Give a man a fish and feed him for a day, teach him to fish and feed him for a lifetime.

 

Chicken- God's perpetual food source.

 

Producer of Heritage Tamwork Pork, the Bacon Pig, and Freedom Ranger Poultry

Reply
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 

Today a lady I gave roosters to before came over to show me how to process. We started with a 15 month old BLRW rooster that my parents didn't want. It was a lot harder than I thought it would be. She killed him using the cone and slitting the throat. I don't think the knife was sharp enough or he was just a tough bird! His breast is pretty scawny but he has nice legs. I am thinking of just using him to make stock.

 

We processed one of my Cornish X hens next. Soooo much easier! I didn''t do the killing, but did everything else. I should have left more neck skin, but other than that, it looks great!  I'm feeling pretty proud of myself and the bird looked so healthy! It was so satisfying to see that bird laying there that I raised myself! I can't wait to eat it!

 

I have 3 left and am thinking of doing them this weekend,.We were discussing ways that I might be able to do the kill and came up with an idea. I am going to buy a heavy fishing weight and tie it around the chicken's neck. Then I am going to put it in the cone, weight first and see if it will pull the head down and keep it out the bottom of the cone, then lop the head off with some sharp hedge cutter or garden shears. Do you think this will work?

 

Oh, and my broody BLRW took my 12 Cornish chicks! I don't have to take care of them! Yaay!


Edited by angelbabyamy - 5/25/12 at 5:27pm
post #17 of 19
Way to go thumbsup.gif
Hens: 16 Leghorns or California Whites, 5 Trader Joe's Leghorns, 14 Red Stars or Gold Stars, 10 Buff Orpingtons, 2 Rhodes Island Reds, 4 Silver Laced Wyandotes, 4 Ameraucana, 7 Barred Rock, 1 Silver Laced Wyandote X Barred Rock, 1 Leghorn X Barred Rock. = 64 Hens - chicks 89
Roosters: 1 Trader Joe's Leghorn Rooster, 1 Leghorn X Barred Rock Rooster
Nursing Home hatch-a-long
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Hens: 16 Leghorns or California Whites, 5 Trader Joe's Leghorns, 14 Red Stars or Gold Stars, 10 Buff Orpingtons, 2 Rhodes Island Reds, 4 Silver Laced Wyandotes, 4 Ameraucana, 7 Barred Rock, 1 Silver Laced Wyandote X Barred Rock, 1 Leghorn X Barred Rock. = 64 Hens - chicks 89
Roosters: 1 Trader Joe's Leghorn Rooster, 1 Leghorn X Barred Rock Rooster
Nursing Home hatch-a-long
Reply
post #18 of 19

i have been fretting about killing my first birds.  it never occurred to me to contact the lady i bought my last five from.  this thread gave me the obvious idea.  maybe she processes her own chickens and will give me a tutorial.

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelbabyamy View Post

Today a lady I gave roosters to before came over to show me how to process. We started with a 15 month old BLRW rooster that my parents didn't want. It was a lot harder than I thought it would be. She killed him using the cone and slitting the throat. I don't think the knife was sharp enough or he was just a tough bird! His breast is pretty scawny but he has nice legs. I am thinking of just using him to make stock.

We processed one of my Cornish X hens next. Soooo much easier! I didn''t do the killing, but did everything else. I should have left more neck skin, but other than that, it looks great!  I'm feeling pretty proud of myself and the bird looked so healthy! It was so satisfying to see that bird laying there that I raised myself! I can't wait to eat it!

I have 3 left and am thinking of doing them this weekend,.We were discussing ways that I might be able to do the kill and came up with an idea. I am going to buy a heavy fishing weight and tie it around the chicken's neck. Then I am going to put it in the cone, weight first and see if it will pull the head down and keep it out the bottom of the cone, then lop the head off with some sharp hedge cutter or garden shears. Do you think this will work?

Oh, and my broody BLRW took my 12 Cornish chicks! I don't have to take care of them! Yaay!

I think your way will work fine for you. Never heard of that before but if you want to lop off the heads, that sounds like a great way to do it.

Grats on your broody taking the chicks!! Nothing better than letting a chicken do all the work.

Lay down with dogs and you get up with fleas.


Love those Orps!

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Lay down with dogs and you get up with fleas.


Love those Orps!

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