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is it possible to treat for cocci and worms at the same time? corid & wazine

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I started this 7-8 week old chick on corid, but the poops had both cocci and roundworms in it. She's been having trouble standing and walking, and the cocci + worm may be the cause.

 

I could make a single dose with wazine, and use the feeding syringe to make sure it all goes in (it's just about 5 tbsp for one bird, diluted), but my question is, will she be harmed by both meds at the same time or can i go ahead?

 

Also, should i discontinue extra vitamins? I read thiamin can interfere with corid.

 

thanks!

post #2 of 10

You should treat for cocci first, because it is a quick killer. After 4-5 days of the last treatment and no signs of cocci, then you can treat for worms. 

 

Trouble standing and walking is not a very good sign when dealing with a cocci infection. It is almost too late for the bird at this point.

However, if you have a strong bird, it may live.

You should always treat for cocci at the very first sign of bloody poop, because it takes a while for the signs to become evident and by then you have a short period of time to treat before death.(usually a few hours to 3 days) at the very most.

 

Worry about the worms after the bird has recovered from cocci infection, no matter how long it takes. Fresh food/water/ and comfortable surroundings and temp should help the bird heal better.

RIR, SQ Silver Penciled rocks, SQ white/bbs bearded silkies,and 1 cat..  Member of American Silkie Bantam Club

 

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RIR, SQ Silver Penciled rocks, SQ white/bbs bearded silkies,and 1 cat..  Member of American Silkie Bantam Club

 

My website is now up and running.
http://RCPoultry.webs.com

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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

ok, thanks. there were no bloody poops, i was starting to think it was mareks. the other chicks tested positive too, but show no sign of illness at all. everyone on corid now. 

post #4 of 10

I doubt a single bird in my flock over 2 weeks old will test negative to cocci and many will have worms.  In the occasional instance when a bird gets heavily infested with both it is hard to treat.  Both worms and cocci can kill if load is heavy.  Can vet give estimate of which is particularly high?  If yes, then concentrate efforts on worst of two.  Both treatments in themselves can be hard on birds so combined in a bird already weakend by high load is tough.  Be prepared to use syringe to apply fluidized food so as to keep bird hydrated.  Also make certain adequate heat present.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

vet could not say which was worse. There are no visible worms in the poops, then again there is no blood either. I doing corid now, and am giving it extra corid water and soft food as well to make sure it eats enough. It's still eating and drinking on its own, but not a lot.

post #6 of 10

Hopefully just cocci are major problem now.  Dehydration I combat by using the powdered formula used for baby parrots.  I make into a slurry then force feed chick with syringe.  I feed enough to nearly fill crop 3 times daily.  The formula is easier to digest than typical chick feed.   If chick is to survive, then marked improvement should be noted withing 24 hours.  Affected chicks are prone to secondary infections of gut that can spread beyond gut quickly.   Keep chick warm. If chick still alive after 48 hours then full recovery of digestive tract will still take a good week and chick will be behind in size.  I decided to watch some banded birds seriously effected by cocci and trying to determine if growth effects are permanent.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

To be perfectly honest, I have no idea what is going on with this chick. 

 

Monday i noticed it was sitting down a lot with its front legs sticking out and not strong enough to stand (there is a post on that, i don't want to duplicate). So i put it on vitamins/st john's worth/turmeric. I thought it was neurological or marek's (my entire flock vaccinated, and this would be the first bird to get it; unless the hatchery didn't vaccinate her!). all the other chicks are well. There were no obvious signs of worms or cocci. She does have decreased appetite, and she finds it hard to move around, when she tries to stand, first she stumbles a few steps backwards, then starts going forward. But when she just stands, she falls down on her butt, feet in front. Poop tested positive for both cocci and roundworms, and she just completed the first 24 hours of corid. I am also in two mind about what i should have treated first. Given there are no visible worms in poops, cocci sounded worst.

 

I stopped giving the save-a-chick and the vitamin b as i read somewhere thiamin can interfere negatively with the corid. I am giving her yogurt, mashed feed and water, some tinned cat food, some shredded fruit. She will eat baby cake on her own, and the cat food, but not enough. 

 

I am giving her one more week to see if she shows improvement. I found a vet that can put her down, and send the body for a necropsy if we get to that point (which seems more and more likely to me!).

 

thanks for the replies!

post #8 of 10

Vaccinations for Mareks reduces odds a bird will be infected and must be given to work.  I tangle with Mareks almost every year and it will strike soon if plays out like in preceeding years.  Many of my birds are intended for long-term keeping so I tried two years running to carry them through rather than put them down.  In about 2/3's of cases birds never regained ability to walk and died within about 45 days from onset of signs, maximum.  Balance regained ability to walk but none survived for a single year.  Now if a bird goes down to what I suspect is Mareks, then it is culled immediately.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

I spoke to a chicken vet expert and she confirmed for me that it is safe to use piperazine and amprol at the same time, just for the record. 


Edited by soler - 9/10/12 at 2:12pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by soler View Post

I spoke to a chicken vet expert and she confirmed for me that it is safe to use piperazine and amprol at the same time, just for the record. 

I know this is an old thread but I just wanted to thank you for posting this info. I purchased two Aussie pullets and within a week or two one started expelling bloody intestinal lining, a LOT. finally after a long battle thought it was under control then this morning I find new blood and a little tissue AND an adult round worm, Geesh. The pullet had just been started on the reduced dose so I started a desperate search to find this exact answer. THANK YOU!
This is the day the Lord has made. Let us rejoice and be glad in it!
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This is the day the Lord has made. Let us rejoice and be glad in it!
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