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Hen with a bulgy, lumpy bottom - ascities, hernia, or other ailment? - Page 4

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post

I ask about human antibiotics because they're usually in pill form. Animal antibiotics are fine, too, but the ones from the feedstore require mixing in water or injecting. If she has an infection you would want to treat with a broad spectrum antibiotic, but not sure if doxycycline qualifies.

-Kathy

 

Would duramycin be a good one to try? I can separate her in the coop so that she is the only one drinking that water. 

post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post

I ask about human antibiotics because they're usually in pill form. Animal antibiotics are fine, too, but the ones from the feedstore require mixing in water or injecting. If she has an infection you would want to treat with a broad spectrum antibiotic, but not sure if doxycycline qualifies.

-Kathy

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HenOnTheHill View Post
 

Update on my lumpy hen: I kept her in the mudroom the last few days to give her a chance to relax and observe her behavior. Her poop still looks normal, eyes are bright, and she is still eating well. Thursday she did not lay, Friday she laid a soft shelled egg, and yesterday another small, but normal looking one. This morning I put her back out in the coop/run and she went about her business as usual with the other hens. Her bulge is the same size as it was, and is warm, but not really more than the rest of her body feels. 

 

Kathy, You asked if I had any human antibiotics. What would be the reason for them vs. animal antibiotics? I think I have some doxycycline that should still be in date, but need to find the bottle. The vet is not really an option for us. 

 

If it makes sense to try, I can separate her in the coop in a crate and give her antibiotics to see if it does anything. 

 

Update on the Update: When I went back out to check on things this afternoon, her bulge looked like the outer layer of skin had split and was red, not bleeding, but looked like it was on the verge of doing so. I did not see any other hens going after her, so I don't know if someone pecked at it or if it split by itself. I put her back in the garage. I think I'm going to start her on duramycin. I am not fond of giving antibiotics, but in this case if it is an infection, I don't think it could hurt.

post #33 of 38
I had an EE who developed a waddle over a few days. When I finally looked at her, she had a softball sized water balloon lump similar to what you and others described. I gave her a bath and took the opportunity to really feel the area and map out its margins. After a bit of trepidation, I decided to drain the area. I wound up getting nearly 10oz of fluid off the lump. She was isolated for a couple days thereafter and dosed with an antibiotic for 3 days. She pulled through just fine and is back to normal. IMO, folks treat chickens like grandma's china sometimes hmm.png. If there's an issue, address it.
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by HenOnTheHill View Post
 

Update on the Update: When I went back out to check on things this afternoon, her bulge looked like the outer layer of skin had split and was red, not bleeding, but looked like it was on the verge of doing so. I did not see any other hens going after her, so I don't know if someone pecked at it or if it split by itself. I put her back in the garage. I think I'm going to start her on duramycin. I am not fond of giving antibiotics, but in this case if it is an infection, I don't think it could hurt.

If there is an infection Duramycin *might* help, but many bacteria are resistant to it. Guess I was hoping that you had some Cipro or Augmentin hanging around...

 

-Kathy

post #35 of 38
Thread Starter 

Update on the bulgy hen: She has been reunited with her flock mates and so far, she is acting like her regular, old self. No one is going after her backside (thankfully), and her eggs are slowly getting larger again. The bulge has not grown or changed size, so as long as she seems healthy and happy, we will let her go about her business as usual. 

post #36 of 38
Sorry to barge in but I have been learning a lot from reading all of the posts. I recently got 10 chickens from a neighbor. They are not quite a year old yet but one of them has something coming from its buttock. I am assuming it's a hernia but I'm not sure. I love the chicken so I don't want to kill it but I also don't want to spend money at the vet. Attached is the chickens vent. There is now poop on its feathers surrounding it and the vent looks as if it is bulging out. Any advice as to what I should do?
post #37 of 38

Shananagan25, your hen looks to have a prolapsed vent. It may have become further damaged by the others pecking at the prolapse. Separate her in a cage that can be covered or placed in the dark for 16 hours per every day to stop laying. Clean off the vent, and apply honey, sugar, or Preparation H ointment to the vent, and try to push the prolapsed red tissue back inside. It may come back out, but keep pushing it back in and hold it there for a few minutes. If the vent is damaged it may take some time for the swelling to go down. Keep the vent moist with the honey or ointment, since if the tissue dries out, it can turn black and die. Epsom salts warm baths daily to her vent may help keep it clean, and you can scrub off any infected or damaged area.

post #38 of 38
Yeah, my hen definitely suffered a hernia. Went out this evening to close up the coop and found my 3 year old French Copper Maran with a bloody pool beneath her and dangling intestines. I initially thought she had prolasped cloaca. Brought her inside, and cleaned her up, she has had the bulged lump (previously checked for a bound egg, no dice) for at least a year. With light shed on the problem her intestines, about 18 inches had exited the cavity. Sorry, no pictures... My wife was a little disturbed!
After cleaning her up we ascertained that it was her navel that had split open. Antiseptic and Ky helped ease them back in,but had to cut the abdomen a bit to ease the process. I wish I had a suture kit, but sewing needle and fishing line served the purpose.
Olde girl is resting quietly, hope she can take it easy for a week or two.
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