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That scared me!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I was outside in the drive talking this afternoon. As I looked out toward the back yard (my roo crowed, alert crow) I scan and see a hawk perched in the CLOSEST tree in my neighbor's yard to mine. I ran out back and as I'm coming out the back door that hawk who was HUGE swooped down and was going to make an attempt to access my chickens. I think I startled it with the slam of the back door. It had swooped but right after the door slam it came back up and went off out the back part of the yard and perched itself in a squatting spot in a tree behind my property watching. I snapped a couple (crappy quality I think) pictures and went to move toward and scare it off, it flew off. I ran back into the house to grab extra wire, pliers, and a few other supplies. Headed back out and spent the next 2 1/2hrs reinforcing and running extra wire for extra protection. I had it on my to do list to add more wire in (I ran out and had to buy some), but hadn't gotten to that point yet. 

I knew hawks were a concern (along with owls and a few other predators), they like to hang out in the area, and a hawk just got the neighbor's male duck (I'm sure of it now), but I figured since I'm out there so often and the hawks hadn't messed with anything I had some time. I think since having a taste of what's around the hawks decided to be bolder. I really hope that all the work I did was enough, I feel like it is after taking a good look at it.

post #2 of 9

Shotgun loaded with some #5s should be about right for your problem predator!  Keep it close and handy to the chicken's area.

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaPineEggs View Post
 

Shotgun loaded with some #5s should be about right for your problem predator!  Keep it close and handy to the chicken's area.

It is illegal to shoot hawks.

 

 

I would recommend putting a wire or net above the run or any other place a hawk could enter. I've lost 3 chickens to a cooper's hawk and I've found that's the only solution. 

I set fire to the rain! Watch it pour as I, touched your face. Well it burn while I cried, because I heard it screaming out your name. And I threw us into flames. I knew that was the last time, the last time...I set fire to the rain! -Adele

 

Look at my flock page! http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bantamfan4lifes-flock

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I set fire to the rain! Watch it pour as I, touched your face. Well it burn while I cried, because I heard it screaming out your name. And I threw us into flames. I knew that was the last time, the last time...I set fire to the rain! -Adele

 

Look at my flock page! http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bantamfan4lifes-flock

Reply
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by BantamFan4Life View Post
 

It is illegal to shoot hawks.

 

 

I would recommend putting a wire or net above the run or any other place a hawk could enter. I've lost 3 chickens to a cooper's hawk and I've found that's the only solution. 

Nope. Totally legal to kill any animal caught in the act of killing your livestock!

 

Bye the way, when it comes to birds of prey I would never kill one UNLESS caught in the act.


Edited by LaPineEggs - 9/22/15 at 5:39pm
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Shotgun loaded with some #5s should be about right for your problem predator!  Keep it close and handy to the chicken's area. 

Nope, hawks are federally protected from NOT just being killed, but intentionally harmed, so I'm screwed on that one.

 

I have wire running across the top, but it wasn't enough, I had ran out before finishing so I had to buy some, and I didn't have a chance to go out and finish it. You can bet your butt I did immediately today. I spent 2 1/2 hours out there working on it. I doubt one can get in with all of it now. I can't really get a picture to show how small and tight things are now because it doesn't really show well on my phone (and hard to get a good angle to get a full pic).

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Legal Status

All hawks and owls are federally protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 USC, 703-711). These laws strictly prohibit the capture, killing, or possession of hawks or owls without special permit. No permits are required to scare depredating migratory birds except for endangered or threatened species (see Table 1), including bald and golden eagles.

In addition, most states have regulations regarding hawks and owls. Some species may be common in one state but may be on a state endangered species list in another. Consult your local USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services, US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and/or state wildlife department representatives for permit requirements and information.

 
Quote:

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

The ultimate solution to raptor depredation is prevention. Free-roaming farmyard chickens, ducks, and pigeons attract hawks and owls and are highly susceptible to predation. Many problems can be eliminated by simply housing poultry at night. They can be conditioned to move into coops or houses by feeding or watering them indoors at dusk. If depredation persists, durable fenced enclosures can be constructed by securing poultry wire to a wooden framework and covering the enclosure with poultry wire, nylon netting, or overhead wires (Fig. 2). A double layer of overhead netting separated by a 5-to 6-inch (12- to 15-cm) space may be necessary to keep owls away from penned birds. Large poultry operations rarely have depredation problems because most practice confinement.

 

Only under extreme conditions MIGHT I be allowed to get a permit. I would even have to get a permit to TRAP and RELOCATE one of them. I would have had to exhaust all non-lethal/non-harmful options before even applying. So, my chickens stay confined and I do the best I can to protect them. It sucks that I have to accept the fact I may have occasional loss, but it is what it is.

post #7 of 9

Thanks for those links. I really didn't think it would be that difficult to get a permit, but I see your point.  I guess shooting the problem bird caught in the act then calling the F&G to come out and examine the situation isn't good enough anymore.:( 

post #8 of 9
While not allowed by federal law some states do provide the exception for protection of livestock. Since state fish and wildlife are the primary licensors and enforcers, if you can prove the animal in question is the one endangering your birds you'd most likely be fine. I know this exception exists in Oklahoma and I'm assuming from the previous post it does in Oregon. You'd have to check the NC fish and game regulations. I don't for a minute say that prevention shouldn't be the first option but you should check with local regulations to see what your options are if you're dealing with a persistent predator.

It sounds like your doing what needs to be done to prevent future attacks. Hopefully your flock can once again free range without unwanted intruders. smile.png
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

My flock never was free range (as much as I would love that in my almost acre back yard). I can't because of the hawks and owls, and other birds of prey. I already looked up state regulations for protections. Hawks are on the federally protected list (and my state listing they're listed as protected along with owls, vultures, etc). Every day they are around, lying in wait, perched in trees, it's nothing new. I was aware of the hawks, owls, and other birds of prey long before I got chickens.

 

This one is specific to North Carolina (NCWRC), but it's not different than federal:

Quote:

Under federal and state law, it is illegal for anyone to injure, harass, kill or possess a bird of prey or any parts of a bird of prey. This includes harming or removing a nest. If you find an injured hawk, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Red-shouldered hawks need healthy riparian forests for hunting and nesting. Avoid draining wetlands or impacting wooded stream corridors. Degraded habitat does not provide adequate nest sites or prey.

Hawks may suffer from improper pesticide use when they feed on prey that has been exposed to pesticides or feed on other animals that have ingested pesticides. Limit the use of pesticides when possible and always use according to directions on the label.

 
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