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natural egg laying cycle overrides winter laying?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

i heard from a farmer once, that the natural laying cycle of the chicken who is starting to lay will override the lack of sunlight hours in the winter that brings on less egg laying.  does anyone know if this is true?  

post #2 of 6
Chickens need 14-16 hours of light stimulation to produce an egg regardless of their age, their natural laying cycle is based on this light amount, so they lay during the long summer days...
Edited by MeepBeep - 10/3/15 at 12:54pm
post #3 of 6


I was wondering this same thing.  I have 10 pullets, four of which have just started to lay in the two weeks.  We are currently only getting 12 hours of daylight and I am still getting four eggs per day.  I have read on a number of threads in the BYC forums that pullets will lay through their first year without supplemental lighting.  I was hoping that was true and that my remaining six pullets would start laying in the coming weeks.

Happy owner of a mixed flock of 10 hens:  4 Easter Eggers, 2 Rhode Island Reds,

2 Barred Rocks, 2 Buff Orpingtons

Reply

Happy owner of a mixed flock of 10 hens:  4 Easter Eggers, 2 Rhode Island Reds,

2 Barred Rocks, 2 Buff Orpingtons

Reply
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiverHouseHens View Post


I was wondering this same thing.  I have 10 pullets, four of which have just started to lay in the two weeks.  We are currently only getting 12 hours of daylight and I am still getting four eggs per day.  I have read on a number of threads in the BYC forums that pullets will lay through their first year without supplemental lighting.  I was hoping that was true and that my remaining six pullets would start laying in the coming weeks.

They will lay through the first year and not go into a molt, but egg production will drop as the hours of light continue to drop...

Even though the official sunrise and sunset times are about 12 hours apart right now, the amount of light needed to stimulate egg production extends into the twilight hours before sunrise and after sunset, so basically they are still getting give or take 14 hours of light stimulation right now...
post #5 of 6

That's good to hear, MeepBeep!  Thanks for clearing it up for me :) 

Happy owner of a mixed flock of 10 hens:  4 Easter Eggers, 2 Rhode Island Reds,

2 Barred Rocks, 2 Buff Orpingtons

Reply

Happy owner of a mixed flock of 10 hens:  4 Easter Eggers, 2 Rhode Island Reds,

2 Barred Rocks, 2 Buff Orpingtons

Reply
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
The farmer was clear in stating if the chickens are born at the right time, their bodies will override the needing light rule, therefore giving you eggs year round. I dont see her anymore so cant ask details and a quick internet search did not give me many results. Hmmm, I think she meant they need to start laying near winter time, but I'm not sure, was hoping for more details.
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