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Feed advice???

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
My chicks are quickly growing on the medicated feed I have for them now. I wasn't sure, though, if once they are more grown if Roos need different food than laying hens? Any advice?
post #2 of 6

You can transition to a Flock Raiser type feed at 8 to 12 weeks of age, and feed it forever with oyster shell on the side, or feed layer after the pullets are all in lay, with oyster shell on the side.  If you want your rooster to live forever, probably the Flock Raiser is the best way to go.  Mary

post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post

You can transition to a Flock Raiser type feed at 8 to 12 weeks of age, and feed it forever with oyster shell on the side, or feed layer after the pullets are all in lay, with oyster shell on the side.  If you want your rooster to live forever, probably the Flock Raiser is the best way to go.  Mary

X2
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
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http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/990759/chickens-in-permaculture

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1008185/lets-talk-relocation

3rd generation of Colorado ranchers, raising organic alfalfa, corn, Red Angus cattle, Suffolk sheep and of course, chickens! Comitted to a lifetime of health without chemicals, I am entirely dependent on what God has given me to nurture soil, plant, and animal. Sharing...
Reply
post #4 of 6

Are you keeping, rehoming or eating the extra roos? Keep in mind, roos that grow up with flock mates and have no established flock to integrate in tend to be bullies. They're known to clumsily and/or aggressively mate, terrorize and even injure your hens. Add more than one roo or a high hen to roo ratio and that problem multiplies. A common rule of thumb is 1 rooster for 10 hens. If you're not keeping them, they can probably stay on grower feed until they're gone. You'll want them gone or separated by sexual maturity. 

 

If they're still with the layers when they start producing eggs, they can either stay on grower or switch to a flock feed and offer oyster shells on the side for the hens to take what they need. Feeding layer food to a rooster can lead to kidney failure from the excess caclium.

As a matter of fact, that is chicken poo on my arm. Why do you ask?
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As a matter of fact, that is chicken poo on my arm. Why do you ask?
Reply
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
We are hoping that all the chicks are females, but if we end up with a few Roos then we will most likely keep them seperate. Our kids already love all the chickens.
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by DcockyD View Post

We are hoping that all the chicks are females, but if we end up with a few Roos then we will most likely keep them seperate. Our kids already love all the chickens.
What breed are they? Some chickens are sex-linked and others are easy to tell as youngsters.
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