New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

29 weeks no eggs RIR - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

 Sometimes first year layers will lay all winter without supplemental lighting, sometimes they won't.
Older layers need 14-16 hours of light to lay regularly thru winter. Last winter I used a 40 watt incandescent light(this year I am using a CFL) that comes on early in the morning to provide 14-15 hours of light and they go to roost with the natural sundown.  Last year I started the lighting increase a bit late(mid October), the light should be increased slowly, and the pullets didn't start laying until late December. Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting. Some folks think that using lighting shortens the years a hen will lay, I don't agree with that theory but I also plan to cull my older hens for soup at about 3 years old.
Not sure if compacts make a difference but, I have read that chickens can see motion something like 10 times faster then we can. Fluorescent lights actually blink faster then the human eye can detect but chickens can see this strobe affect which, if true, has to be extremely annoying. Just a thought.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zackman23434 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

 Sometimes first year layers will lay all winter without supplemental lighting, sometimes they won't.
Older layers need 14-16 hours of light to lay regularly thru winter. Last winter I used a 40 watt incandescent light(this year I am using a CFL) that comes on early in the morning to provide 14-15 hours of light and they go to roost with the natural sundown.  Last year I started the lighting increase a bit late(mid October), the light should be increased slowly, and the pullets didn't start laying until late December. Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting. Some folks think that using lighting shortens the years a hen will lay, I don't agree with that theory but I also plan to cull my older hens for soup at about 3 years old.
Not sure if compacts make a difference but, I have read that chickens can see motion something like 10 times faster then we can. Fluorescent lights actually blink faster then the human eye can detect but chickens can see this strobe affect which, if true, has to be extremely annoying. Just a thought.

Flicker rates on old style fluorescent ballasts are detrimental to chicken eyes...but the newer ones are not.

I think there's a link in that article that I linked above that talks about that.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Flicker rates on old style fluorescent ballasts are detrimental to chicken eyes...but the newer ones are not.
I think there's a link in that article that I linked above that talks about that.

Awesome. Sounds like you are way ahead of me.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying