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How to tell who is laying

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi there. So I am new to chickens. I have 26 laying hens that started laying again about 6 days ago. Yesterday I got 13 eggs. Aside from sitting there all day is there any way to figure out who is laying. I don't want to feed chickens that are not laying. Maybe I should get a video camera! The previous owner said he was getting about 2 dozen a day. I figure I will wait it out for a week or 2 and see if I get more eggs.
post #2 of 9

Much depends on the age of the birds and their breed. If they're less than 4 years old, I wouldn't say they're done. 10 year old hens can lay eggs.

Any stress inhibits ovulation. As creatures of habit, moving is stressful.

 

To answer your question, with that many birds, the best technique is to check the distance between the pelvic bones. 2 fingers or more and they're likely laying. Less and they likely aren't.

 

However, just because they shut down now doesn't mean they won't be great layers after molt or after the winter solstice. During molt and any other time they quit, the pelvic bones move closer together. The combs also shrivel and pale.

Probably the time of year combined with the move is the problem.

They sometimes shut down for winter and lay like gangbusters from March to September.

 

If you only want birds that lay constantly, you need to start with pullets about 6 months of age and replace them every 18 months.


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 10/28/15 at 10:44am

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Awesome. This is great advice! They are about 1.5 years and we plan on starting to replace next year. But maybe we will wait then till next summer to judge who can stay
post #4 of 9

CC has given great info/advice...but I'm curious.

 

Did you just get these birds?

What do you mean by....."started laying again"? 

Are you in the northern hemisphere?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
I live in Wisconsin. They are about 1.5 years old. When I picked them up they had started the molting process. And from the stress of moving I was told they would take a little time to start laying again. We are up to 16 eggs today! And I am pretty sure there is at least 1 more that will lay yet today
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjkleck View Post

I live in Wisconsin. They are about 1.5 years old. When I picked them up they had started the molting process. And from the stress of moving I was told they would take a little time to start laying again. We are up to 16 eggs today! And I am pretty sure there is at least 1 more that will lay yet today

So how long have you had them?

Are the ones laying done with molting?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
It will be 3 weeks on sunday. I believe all of them are done molting.
post #8 of 9

If they're done molting and you really need the eggs now, it's time to add light to the coop. Enough on a timer to get at least 13 hours of day length (sunlight + added light), bright enough to read a newspaper by at roost height.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Yes we added a light a week ago! I guess I posted this too soon! Yesterday we got 20 eggs!
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