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Hen therapy

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I want to take my little ladies to a nursing home for some hen therapy and wondering what I do when they poo. Is there some type of diaper or covering I can use
Thank you
post #2 of 7

I have seen diapers on chickens and ducks before. Not sure where you would get them though.

post #3 of 7


Hi, I know of one website called Hensavers, they have diapers.  I think they are in the US. Hope this helps and Good Luck with the Chicken Therapy.  Lifes too short not to hug a warm friendly chicken.

:jumpy

post #4 of 7

Also, make sure you clip and file off nails.  Chicken nails can easily tear through our skin, let alone elderly skin.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

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Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

Reply
post #5 of 7

My Pet Chicken sells the diapers, i believe.

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by jastevens View Post

I want to take my little ladies to a nursing home for some hen therapy and wondering what I do when they poo. Is there some type of diaper or covering I can use
Thank you

Do you have permission to do this yet?

I'd think they wouldn't allow it.....huge chance of bringing in organisms that those folks might not have immunity against.

 

If it is allowed, I do some trial runs with the diapers at home to make sure your birds will tolerate them before visiting.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 7
If you are planning to visit residents that are not your family members, you will probably need (as required by many facilities) insurance. Even if you don't need it, you might want it. Imagine getting sued because your bird pecked someone' grandma in the eye.

Insurance is available through just about every therapy animal organization. You'll need to research to see which ones will let you register birds and if chickens are excluded.

Pet Partners is an excellent organization that supports its members well with guidance and education. They allow birds to be registered with them. They require the bird wear a leash, harness, and feces containment device during visits. Additionally, the bird must be docile and easily handled. They may have requirements regarding how the bird is housed and what its diet is to prevent the spread of certain pathogens to the people you visit.

Visits from therapy animals can be wonderful for patients and elderly residents but it isn't as simple as bringing an animal to visit. As a handler you'll have a huge responsibility to the physical and emotional well-being of your animal, the patient, and even that patient's family. As a handler you'll need to learn how to conduct safe visits that are respectful of the patients' rights.
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