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How do you know that a hen is setting?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
In the summer I'm hoping to have some setting hens. If the eggs are warm does it mean that the egg is being sat on or does it mean that it was just laid? Or will the hen be in the nesting box all the time?
Edited by austrolover1 - 1/23/16 at 6:23am
Romans 3:23 – for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.

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Romans 3:23 – for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.

Romans 10:9-10 – that if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.

 

Check out my photo contest!!!!

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post #2 of 6

A broody hen will spend at least 22-23 hours a day on the nest, only leaving for a quick bite of food, drink, stretch, and poo. A warm egg is a freshly laid egg.

post #3 of 6

Look for them on the nest at night.  Sometimes, hens will stay in the nest box after laying to rest, but only broodies stay on the nest at night.  Other symptoms of a broody hen:

 

Quit laying eggs

Plucking belly feathers

Puffing up and screaming at you when you go to check for eggs. (though some birds that are not broody can do this too, but it's more pronounced with broodies)

Looking flat, like a pancake

Making soft, clucking sounds (often called the broody cluck)

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



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Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

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post #4 of 6
My test for if a hen is broody or not is that she has to spend two consecutive nights on the nest instead of in her normal roosting spot. I’ve had some hens show a lot of signs of being broody but they don’t always kick over into full broody mode, even the ones that spend most of the time during the day on the nest or walk around fluffed up and clucking. I’ve even had hens that spend one night on the nest but then don’t go back.

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http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #5 of 6

I agree with the above. I've wanted a broody so much I've put eggs under a hen that wasn't fully committed, and that doesn't end well. Some hens, it's from one day to the next, one day she's normal and not interested, the next BOOM you can't get her off that nest. Other hens take a while to be fully in broody mode, they practice and flirt with it and generally drive you insane :he. But the best way to tell is to check the box at night. If she's roosting in the normal spot, she's not ready for eggs yet. If she's in the box, looking like a pancake, for at least two nights in a row, you should be good to give her eggs to set on. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Chooks View Post
 

Look for them on the nest at night.  Sometimes, hens will stay in the nest box after laying to rest, but only broodies stay on the nest at night.  Other symptoms of a broody hen:

 

Quit laying eggs

Plucking belly feathers

Puffing up and screaming at you when you go to check for eggs. (though some birds that are not broody can do this too, but it's more pronounced with broodies)

Looking flat, like a pancake

Making soft, clucking sounds (often called the broody cluck)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

My test for if a hen is broody or not is that she has to spend two consecutive nights on the nest instead of in her normal roosting spot. I’ve had some hens show a lot of signs of being broody but they don’t always kick over into full broody mode, even the ones that spend most of the time during the day on the nest or walk around fluffed up and clucking. I’ve even had hens that spend one night on the nest but then don’t go back.

Both these^^^

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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