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Sustaining the amount of water used

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have my own hens at home and am about to begin a school project, my teacher wants to know how I can reduce the use of water when taking care of laying hens. Does anyone have any great ideas that they use that works? Thanks in advance :)

post #2 of 7

The best way is to use a closed nipple system.

Don't cause the chickens to have insufficient water.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 7

x2  A closed nipple system means no more spilled or soiled water. As a side note horizontal nipples leak less than the vertical nipples saving even more water.

If  you ain't the lead dog the view never changes!
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If  you ain't the lead dog the view never changes!
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much :)

post #5 of 7

What do you mean by... 'reduce the use of water'....and the word 'sustain' in the title?

They need to have water available at all times...and they don't 'use' much.


Edited by aart - 1/29/16 at 8:31am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7


Possibly, saving water could apply to how the coop is cleaned also? There are a number of methods, such as the deep litter method that would reduce the physical cleaning of a coop with water.

 

CT

Nairobi, Kenya
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Nairobi, Kenya
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKen View Post
 


Possibly, saving water could apply to how the coop is cleaned also? There are a number of methods, such as the deep litter method that would reduce the physical cleaning of a coop with water.

 

CT

<shrugs> I dunno.  Can't give an answer if I don't know the real question.... and it's context.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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