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Baby chicks a week apart?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So, I stopped in at the country store a few days ago with my 13 year old daughter to refill propane, and they had baby chicks. Somehow we went from buying propane to baby chicks. We didn't actually buy any that day, but she was able to talk is into getting some.

We live in a neighborhood on about 1/3 acre. We want to have 4-5 chickens and are planning out a coop. We have researched the kinds of chickens we want to get, and some come in this Friday and others next Friday. Is there an issue raising chicks that are a week apart in the same brooder? Is there an issue raising different types of chickens in the same brooder? Is it okay to get one each of 5 different types of chickens? I've done quite a bit of reading in the last couple days but haven't come across the answers to these questions. Thanks!
post #2 of 9

Hi!  Raising different breeds together should definitely be ok. Also raising chicks together who are 1 week apart should also be ok, just keep an eye on them.

post #3 of 9

Have you given thought to how soon your chicks are going to need a coop?

 

If you think you can get a coop and run all planned and built and finished in four or five weeks from the time you bring home your chicks, then go for it. They will be done with their brooder by then.

 

Actually, it's advantageous to raise your chicks right in the coop from the beginning. It's better for the chicks and easier on your house. (See my article on raising chicks outdoors linked below.)

 

As for chicks being a week apart in age, it's not an issue, nor is different breeds an issue unless you're mixing bantams with standard size chickens. Smaller breeds sometimes have a rough time when in a flock of large breeds.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. We are working on figuring out the chicken coop right now as well, and hope to get a lot of it done this weekend. Of course, if it's anything like every other project around here one project leads to another, which leads to another...
post #5 of 9

I have five chicks myself and they are all different breeds. Well two may be the same, we have a mystery chick so waiting for her to grow up to show us what she is. I have had no issues with them being different breeds. I also got two of them six days after the first three, so they are a little younger. I tried to get the two that were already growing a few feathers on their wings so were probably a few days old. It is amazing how quick they grow. Seems they just explode overnight on me. It is amazing to be able to go down in the morning and actually notice differences. They are now three weeks old and already seeming to be outgrowing their container. They are trying to run around and even trying to flap their wings a bit. They need to hold off a few more weeks. It is still cold here and I have read that they need their feathers before going outside, unless they were placed there from the start. I plan to take them outside and let them run around the pen a bit next week if the weather is nice. Let them stretch out a bit. Chickens are a lot of fun. Enjoy!

post #6 of 9
My advise would be to get the coop the built as soon as possible. They grow so quick. My chicks are eight weeks old and outgrowing their temporary space very quick. I'm about a week away from completing the coop. Plan accordingly though. When I drew out my coop design I figured I could have it done in two weeks tops. Well it usually ends up being more time consuming considering work schedule, money, weather... you name it. Start now, because you'll have full grown chickens before you know it.
post #7 of 9

One week apart may work out just fine.....or not....I had a disaster with it.

Be ready with a separate but adjacent enclosure.....or use a big enough brooder to put a mesh wall in the middle.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #8 of 9

Oh yes you will be just fine, just keep an eye on the chicks to make sure the chicks aren't picking on each other. If you do find yourself with a wounded chick, I would highly suggest either isolating that chick for a few days (depending on how bad the wound is), or switching to a red heat lamp if you don't already have one. My chicks would constantly get picked on, and I didn't know what to do about it, until someone suggested I purchase the red heat lamp rather than the regular heat bulb I was using, and it has REALLY helped, and I haven't had a problem since. I have mixed chicks with 2 week old age difference and they did perfectly fine together, and got along very well. Also mixing breeds is just fine, again just make sure they are picking on each other or drawing any blood. I had a flock of 29 chicks/chickens that included all sorts of breeds, and they all got along well. So don't worry your chicks will all mix and get along great. Hope this helped!!:)

 

-2ChickenFarmer2

post #9 of 9

I raised 3 Australorp chicks that were 8 day older than my other chicks, they made moving the chicks out happen faster considering the big chicks could fly and bump into the smaller chicks before they realized they too could fly about haha. I moved my chicks out at 6 and 7 weeks old and they are doing great! Moving had to happen quick for us cause my annoying Australorp chick was a show off and began crowing at around 6 weeks old. My big chicks made living outside for the smaller guys easier because if a small chick got cold they'd snuggle with the older guys/girls.

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