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SO MAD! - Page 2

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by howfunkyisurchicken View Post

Coryza is transmitted through direct contact, airborne droplets and contamination of drinking water. *I* wouldn't feel great about bringing in new birds with their infected flock being just 200ft away from yours. The typical remedy is an all in, all out cull. Since they've kept their infected birds, and added new chicks, they're building a flock of birds that are unhealthy and carriers of a chronic disease. You can vaccinate for coryza.

Their chicken friend is correct, coryza is a respiratory illness, an acute respiratory illness. You might explain to your neighbors that chickens do not get colds though, they get chronic respiratory diseases that they carry for life. And, as carriers, they can transmit that illness to other birds even while appearing healthy themselves. And, of course, they can relapse back into illness with any little stress and their nightmare will start all over again. No matter how many new chicks they buy to replace the ones that succumb.

If they were my neighbors, I'd go onto Google, print out an overview on infectious coryza (and respiratory illnesses in chickens in general) and present that information to them (and maybe they'll show it to their chicken friend and everyone can educate themselves a little).

I'm so sorry, this is a horrible situation to be dealing with. Especially when the (most likely) responsible party doesn't want to hugs.gif
Done and done and done again. They don't seem to get it. ... I'll just have to wait it out. ..
And start over next year.
Minus $200 a month income, and buyin eggs and chicken from the store. Yuck.
Edited by raeleigh26 - 3/31/16 at 4:07pm
post #12 of 14

Can you call your county Ag. extension office and see if they can give you some concrete information re: the risk to any new flock you might have under these circumstances?  I'm so sorry.  this is a horrid thing to have to deal with, especially with neighbors so close.

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #13 of 14

I've been so blessed, NOT having close neighbors like that!  Talk to your state veterinarian, and Ag Extension, about any recourse you may have to improve this situation, and all the best.  So sorry!  Mary

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 

Can you call your county Ag. extension office and see if they can give you some concrete information re: the risk to any new flock you might have under these circumstances?  I'm so sorry.  this is a horrid thing to have to deal with, especially with neighbors so close.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

I've been so blessed, NOT having close neighbors like that!  Talk to your state veterinarian, and Ag Extension, about any recourse you may have to improve this situation, and all the best.  So sorry!  Mary

Good ideas from LG and Mary.

 

I would also look into testing or necropsy of your bird(s) to find out exactly what disease you are dealing with.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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