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Breeding hatchery stock to SOP, is it worth it? - Page 4

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by K813ZRA View Post
 

I thought an Orpington was a dual purpose breed. I just under the impression that hatchery dual purpose birds are lacking in the meat department. 

 

Orpngtons were original developed as a dual-purpose bird but their popularity as a show bird has reduced the breed to something of an exhibition/ornamental bird. Over the years they were thought to have been out-crossed to other breeds to increase the amount of feathering that make them look distinctively large and showy; but as a proper dual-purpose bird, it'll be a crapshoot what you get from a hatchery. The White Orpington is supposed to be the best layer. The Buff is usually mediocre at best unless they've been bred to increase egg-production, but then meat suffers.


Edited by AllynTal - 4/22/16 at 10:48am

Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

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Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

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post #32 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllynTal View Post
 

 

Orpngtons were original developed as a dual-purpose bird but their popularity as a show bird has reduced the breed to something of an exhibition/ornamental bird. Over the years they were thought to have been out-crossed to other breeds to increase the amount of feathering that make them look distinctively large and showy; but as a proper dual-purpose bird, it'll be a crapshoot what you get from a hatchery. The White Orpington is supposed to be the best layer. The Buff is usually mediocre at best unless they've been bred to increase egg-production, but then meat suffers.

 

Thank you for the information but in the end I have decided to go with hatchery stock. I have been reading every thread I could find on here and other forums and the number of people happy with hatchery birds seems to be 1 to 1 with those who prefer breeder birds for dual purpose reasons. I have come to the conclusion that I am overthinking this and if I don't lean one way or the other I wont have any chickens at all, lol. I intend to have a total of 48 chickens for a family of four we should still have lots of eggs. 

post #33 of 37
If I wanted meat for tables i go with established hatchery meat breed and raise the as they recommend. Do it right and you have birds big enough to butcher in less than 12 weeks. If you want Cornish game hen you butcher at that size. If you want fryers, you butcher at that size and if you want roasters then wait and butcher at that size. This puts your time and resources to best use. Having birds timed to be big enough to go outside in simple moveable grazing pens makes for good eating, too.

With egg layers or eye candy birds,
Yes, not letting an extra roo or an old hen go to waste makes good soup or dumplings. But my experience has been I am best served by getting batch of 25 or 50 hatchery meat chicks, get them raised, butchered and in the freezer.
What I enjoy looking at or being good egg layers by far more important to me than fooling with them for meat. Buff Orpingtons are a favorite for their sweet personality and lovely eggs. They also brood s I can set eggs. Currently I have Buffs, Americaunas and French Black Copper Marans. Only the Marans am I interested in breeding for improvemevt.
Hope you enjoy your birds as that is for me the best part. My stress level goes to nothing watching my birds. Donna in Dandridge Tennessee
Safehaven Farm, Dandridge, TN, USA
Home sweet home to David & Donna Raybon, George the LGD, Jersey cattle, ADGA Nubian dairy goats, Ameracaunas, American & English Buff Orpingtons, French Black (&Blue) Copper Marans, Barred Rock, Austrolorp poultry and one bossy BB Red Bantam house rooster named Poppy
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Safehaven Farm, Dandridge, TN, USA
Home sweet home to David & Donna Raybon, George the LGD, Jersey cattle, ADGA Nubian dairy goats, Ameracaunas, American & English Buff Orpingtons, French Black (&Blue) Copper Marans, Barred Rock, Austrolorp poultry and one bossy BB Red Bantam house rooster named Poppy
Reply
post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by K813ZRA View Post
 

 

Thank you for the information but in the end I have decided to go with hatchery stock. I have been reading every thread I could find on here and other forums and the number of people happy with hatchery birds seems to be 1 to 1 with those who prefer breeder birds for dual purpose reasons. I have come to the conclusion that I am overthinking this and if I don't lean one way or the other I wont have any chickens at all, lol. I intend to have a total of 48 chickens for a family of four we should still have lots of eggs. 


It sounds like for what you want, hatchery stock is a fine choice. I'm not knocking hatchery birds. I found out only after I acquired a small flock that it wasn't the better choice for me. Just as an aside note, I find that a lot of folks here are happy with hatchery chickens because they're chicken collectors -- they want a variety of pretty birds so they have a pretty flock and each chicken has a name -- and/or they want eggs and meat and it doesn't matter if the chickens are cross-bred to get that. There's nothing wrong with that if that's the priority.

 

48 chickens are going to need a really big coop. :ep That's quite an enterprise. Best of luck. :)

Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

Reply

Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

Reply
post #35 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna R Raybon View Post

If I wanted meat for tables i go with established hatchery meat breed and raise the as they recommend. Do it right and you have birds big enough to butcher in less than 12 weeks. If you want Cornish game hen you butcher at that size. If you want fryers, you butcher at that size and if you want roasters then wait and butcher at that size. This puts your time and resources to best use. Having birds timed to be big enough to go outside in simple moveable grazing pens makes for good eating, too.

With egg layers or eye candy birds,
Yes, not letting an extra roo or an old hen go to waste makes good soup or dumplings. But my experience has been I am best served by getting batch of 25 or 50 hatchery meat chicks, get them raised, butchered and in the freezer.
What I enjoy looking at or being good egg layers by far more important to me than fooling with them for meat. Buff Orpingtons are a favorite for their sweet personality and lovely eggs. They also brood s I can set eggs. Currently I have Buffs, Americaunas and French Black Copper Marans. Only the Marans am I interested in breeding for improvemevt.
Hope you enjoy your birds as that is for me the best part. My stress level goes to nothing watching my birds. Donna in Dandridge Tennessee

For me there is a reason I want to go the dual purpose route. Yes, for meat and eggs and for them to be self sufficient but another reason as well. When I was a child my grandfather raised Rhode Island Red's and we had one every Sunday for dinner. So much like you state, for me it is more about the journey or in this case trying to relive the good times I had with my grandfather. Feeding the chickens, collecting the eggs, hatching chicks, learning to butcher and having roast chicken on Sundays. An experience I can relive and share with my wife.

 

I guess for me, just ordering new hatchery chicks every year to butcher won't give me that feeling that I am looking for. 

post #36 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllynTal View Post
 


It sounds like for what you want, hatchery stock is a fine choice. I'm not knocking hatchery birds. I found out only after I acquired a small flock that it wasn't the better choice for me. Just as an aside note, I find that a lot of folks here are happy with hatchery chickens because they're chicken collectors -- they want a variety of pretty birds so they have a pretty flock and each chicken has a name -- and/or they want eggs and meat and it doesn't matter if the chickens are cross-bred to get that. There's nothing wrong with that if that's the priority.

 

48 chickens are going to need a really big coop. :ep That's quite an enterprise. Best of luck. :)

Thank you for the best wishes. I already have plans for two coops and hope to start construction in two weeks. For the time being I have some large rabbit hutches that I am converting into a pair of brooders. I want two coops to separate the Orpingtons and the Wyandottes. Plus for me I think two smaller flocks will be fun, I don't know why but it just seems that way. I have a plan to put a coop on each side of my pool barn office. :D

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by K813ZRA View Post

Thank you for the best wishes. I already have plans for two coops and hope to start construction in two weeks. For the time being I have some large rabbit hutches that I am converting into a pair of brooders. I want two coops to separate the Orpingtons and the Wyandottes. Plus for me I think two smaller flocks will be fun, I don't know why but it just seems that way. I have a plan to put a coop on each side of my pool barn office. big_smile.png

If you have more than fifty feet between coops and you take it day about letting one coop out then next day other coop in a couple weeks you could have each coop trained to return to 'home coop'. Then you could let both out at same time and each would go up to correct coop at night. The roosters would have to negotiate territory. If given enough cover and good hangout areas everyone gets along.

And when you want to hatch off you would pen hens alone for 14 days, then put rooster of choice with hen. I like a 4 x 4 or 8 x 4 hoop pens for breeding/setting/brooding. If your rooster is gentle you can move him pen to pen through the day to mate with up to four seperate hens per day. Once roo figures out what you are doing he can be quite cooperative. A hen served every third day would be fertile. So, you could in theory have twelve breeding pens set up if you were wanting to know for certain parenage of an egg.
Donna in Dandridge, Tennessee
Safehaven Farm, Dandridge, TN, USA
Home sweet home to David & Donna Raybon, George the LGD, Jersey cattle, ADGA Nubian dairy goats, Ameracaunas, American & English Buff Orpingtons, French Black (&Blue) Copper Marans, Barred Rock, Austrolorp poultry and one bossy BB Red Bantam house rooster named Poppy
Reply
Safehaven Farm, Dandridge, TN, USA
Home sweet home to David & Donna Raybon, George the LGD, Jersey cattle, ADGA Nubian dairy goats, Ameracaunas, American & English Buff Orpingtons, French Black (&Blue) Copper Marans, Barred Rock, Austrolorp poultry and one bossy BB Red Bantam house rooster named Poppy
Reply
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