BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Managing Your Flock › Using kerosene heater to heat my coop?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Using kerosene heater to heat my coop? - Page 2

post #11 of 25

...and.....if I recall correctly, burning kerosene produces a lot of moisture.....

....which can be great for the 'human coop' but really bad for the chicken coop.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeepersMama View Post
 

My coop has been way cold this year. When I go out in the mroning, some of them have frost on their feathers. Dad has a kerosene heater that is safe to use in the "human's coop", but would it be safe for the chickens? I know that a lot of people are generally against heating, but the coop needs heat this year. Some of the windows (which are inconvinietly high up) are letting snow in, and they all roost a foot away from eachother :barnie

Thanks in advance

 

If your birds have frost on their feathers, you don't have a heat/cold problem. Your problem is an excess of moisture inside the coop. What you need is more ventilation to allow the moisture to escape to the outside. Moisture is coming from the birds, but also from the snow if snow is blowing in and then melting.

 

Can you share a photograph of the coop where these birds are being housed?

post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 

Howard E, I'll get you a pic soon. If I remember :P :hide I have one (when it was really clean, too!), but I haven't put it on here yet.

I had forgoten that moisture causes issues like that. I read the article in your siggy, aart; it was helpful. The thing is though, if I leave any windows open, then snow gets in. Any tips on keeping airflow moving but keeping the elements out?

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #14 of 25

While it may reduce airflow slightly, how about a regular window screen? Or try tacking up a very loosely woven fabric like cheesecloth...just a single layer might help with snow intrusion.

 

OTOH, better a little snow in coop than too little ventilation. You can scatter some scratch and the chickens will toss it, or you can turn the litter after it snows.


Edited by mobius - 12/18/16 at 9:09pm
post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 

Cool. I know which window is letting in snow, and I think that sparrows are coming in through it too :barnie Dumb birds. 

Do you think that cheese cloth would works? I've never seen any, so I can't really "judge it" or not :/

We use sand for bedding, so if they scratched it around it would just get all muddy :/

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeepersMama View Post
 

Cool. I know which window is letting in snow, and I think that sparrows are coming in through it too :barnie Dumb birds. 

Do you think that cheese cloth would works? I've never seen any, so I can't really "judge it" or not :/

We use sand for bedding, so if they scratched it around it would just get all muddy :/

Any coop opening,

(well, except the pop door, but it should have a locked door), 

should be securely covered with 1/2" hardware cloth...

.....to keep sparrows out, and predators too.

 

Ventilation is best if it is adjustable.....top hinged windows are my favorite because they can be left open and keep out most the weather.

Baffles can be good too, corrugated cardboard works well tacked up inside to redirect airflow away from roost in winter.

But it depends on your coop, site, climate, etc.

That's why a pic of your coop was asked for.

Even that won't totally tell the tale tho.

Make things adjustable then get into coop during high winds and evaluate what is working and what is causing problems then adjust as necessary.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #17 of 25

One thing you posted has me a bit worried.  You said you have a big pot with a heat lamp under it?  Could you explain that more?  

post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 

I think it's a turkey frier pot turned ups-side down, and dad has a red heat lamp attatched under it - basically the chickens can sit on it and warm up their feet. Sometimes the banties will sleep on it.

He got the idea from someone who put candles under a flower pot, and then they could warm up their hands on it. Our's is up off  the ground - sitting on three 4x4's. I'll post a pic of that this morning.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Any coop opening,

(well, except the pop door, but it should have a locked door), 

should be securely covered with 1/2" hardware cloth...

.....to keep sparrows out, and predators too.

 

Ventilation is best if it is adjustable.....top hinged windows are my favorite because they can be left open and keep out most the weather.

Baffles can be good too, corrugated cardboard works well tacked up inside to redirect airflow away from roost in winter.

But it depends on your coop, site, climate, etc.

That's why a pic of your coop was asked for.

Even that won't totally tell the tale tho.

Make things adjustable then get into coop during high winds and evaluate what is working and what is causing problems then adjust as necessary.

IF I know what corrugated card board is, I think I have some laying around. That would probably work.

I'll have dad pick up some window screen.

And I'll go get that pic of the coop right now.

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 


Here's the coop

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #20 of 25

Open up the soffits and cut in some gable vents. The window next to the roosts should be kept closed. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Managing Your Flock › Using kerosene heater to heat my coop?