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What temperature of the water when you are ready to pluck a chicken?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello. At what temperature does the water need to be when you are getting ready to pluck a chicken by hand? And how long does it need to be in there? Thanks for the help.

post #2 of 9

About 160*F.  I dip it in, pull it out, dip it back, shake it around a little until I can easily pull out the wing feathers.  Then it is ready.

Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought....Abraham Lincoln (Freedom carries responsibility)

The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right.....Judge Learned Hand  (The more sure your are that your way is the only right way, the more likely you are wrong.)

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought....Abraham Lincoln (Freedom carries responsibility)

The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right.....Judge Learned Hand  (The more sure your are that your way is the only right way, the more likely you are wrong.)

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks you very much thumbsup

post #4 of 9

Try 140 degrees. I recently used this temperature and found several advantages:

1. Easier on my hands while dunking
2. Easier to handle birds after dunking
3. No ripping of birds' skin
4. Feathers easily removed.

My 2 cents

post #5 of 9

for us, 153 degrees seems to be best.

try a few, play around with the temp (to an extant), and see what you like and what works best for YOU! smile  as you can see, there is no single "right" answer!

ETA guess my thermometer is off... as i have yet to "cook" a bird's skin (or even come close to it) at 153*.  these birds go to others and i have never had a single complaint, only raves on how beautiful they look and how nice and clean the plucking job is.  that temperature definitely doesn't make for an ugly dressed bird here.


Edited by eKo_birdies - 8/4/10 at 8:02am
If you don't rescue, DON'T BREED.

My tax dollars pay for your irresponsibility.  SPAY AND NEUTER YOUR PETS, dog pimp isn't a job.
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If you don't rescue, DON'T BREED.

My tax dollars pay for your irresponsibility.  SPAY AND NEUTER YOUR PETS, dog pimp isn't a job.
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post #6 of 9

If I scald at 150 or higher the pin feathers are harder to remove, and the black pin feathers leave spots on the skin.  It also seems to cook the skin a little, which makes for an ugly dressed bird (I don't care, but I'm selling chickens now and the prettier I can make them the better.) 

I have better luck at 140-145.  Takes a little longer, but the quality overall is better.

Layers: 2 Australorps, 1 Welsummer, 3 Barred Rocks, 1 Splash Orp, 1 BLRW, 1 Buckeye
Growout Pen: empty (for now!)
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Layers: 2 Australorps, 1 Welsummer, 3 Barred Rocks, 1 Splash Orp, 1 BLRW, 1 Buckeye
Growout Pen: empty (for now!)
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post #7 of 9

I just did 20 and I did put your hand in 3 seconds only and its ready! wing feathers pull easily!

post #8 of 9

http://thedeliberateagrarian.blogspot.com/2009/02/how-to-properly-scald-chicken-my-never.html

This
is good information on getting a good scald for plucking.  Check the rest of that site for other great info on butchering.

edited to get the link correct

It's not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy!
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It's not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy!
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post #9 of 9

I have to agree with Salt and Light &  petrelline. 140 - 145 degrees, dunk and swirl, pull from water and test. When the feathers come off easily, it's ready. I also use a plucker.

1 New Hampshire Reds - 1 Rooster (Little Roo), 2 Hens(The grumps),

Love is blind, but marriage is an eye opener - author unknown

The freethinking of one age is the common sense of the next: Mathew Arnold 1822 - 1888

 

My wood shop and our home are 100% solar powered.

 

Website - Etsy - Facebook

 

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1 New Hampshire Reds - 1 Rooster (Little Roo), 2 Hens(The grumps),

Love is blind, but marriage is an eye opener - author unknown

The freethinking of one age is the common sense of the next: Mathew Arnold 1822 - 1888

 

My wood shop and our home are 100% solar powered.

 

Website - Etsy - Facebook

 

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