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What are Michigan Health & Safety Laws for selling small flock eggs?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Anyone know how I can find out if Michigan has any health/safety laws for selling eggs? There's quite a few small flock owners near me with signs out, selling fresh eggs.  Are there rules about not reusing egg cartons? Mandatory vaccinations? Inspections? Safe handling after laying? How do I find out?
The local feed mill buys and sells eggs for small flock owners, in reused cartons, so I'm wondering how restrictive the rules can be.  Even with the salmonella outbreak from the huge egg companies, the feed mills are still selling like they used to.

Proud mom of 2 US Marines!   Happy care-giver to 11 ISA Brown hens, 2 Buff Orpingtons, and 1 Silver Laced Wyandotte; 1 elderly female Rottweiler who thinks she's a cat, 4 sons who are much taller than I am, the most awesome baby granddaughter alive, and a sweet computer geek husband who broods in front of his laptop and hatches incredible software.
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Proud mom of 2 US Marines!   Happy care-giver to 11 ISA Brown hens, 2 Buff Orpingtons, and 1 Silver Laced Wyandotte; 1 elderly female Rottweiler who thinks she's a cat, 4 sons who are much taller than I am, the most awesome baby granddaughter alive, and a sweet computer geek husband who broods in front of his laptop and hatches incredible software.
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post #2 of 3
Thread Starter 

OK... nothing like Google to find stuff, right?

Here's what I found when I searched for "egg safety laws michigan"

  

<<<Operating Policy for Egg Sales at Farmers' Markets

A workgroup was put together in 2008 to focus attention on regulatory issues facing vendors selling products at farmers markets. That workgroup consists of representatives from Michigan Farm Market Association (MIFMA), Michigan Integrated Food and Farming Systems (MIFFS) and MDA.
At the March 31, 2009 meeting, the regulation of shell eggs sold by producers to the final consumer was discussed. A representative of the Office of Attorney General (AG) was present to hear arguments regarding whether or not MDA has the authority to regulate shell eggs sold by the producer to final consumer or first receiver.
MDA has received an Attorney General opinion dated July 17th regarding Exemption of egg producers from licensing as food establishments.  The opinion essentially says that Michigans specific 1963 Egg Law controls over the more general Food Law of 2000.  Section 13 of the Egg Law states that All producers shall comply with this act except those selling eggs of their own production direct to consumers or when delivering to a first receiver.
Based upon the opinion, the department will not license or regulate eggs being sold directly by a producer to a consumer or being sold or delivered to a first receiver (First receiver means a person who receives eggs from a producer at any place of business where such eggs are to be candled, graded, sorted and packed or packaged.  Consumer means a person purchasing eggs for his own family use or consumption).
FDA /USDA regulations would still apply to eggs, where applicable.  Federal egg processing guidelines, created under the federal Shell Egg Surveillance Act, govern the registration and inspection of egg producers who manage large flocks of 3,000 or more hens.>>>

http://www.michigan.gov/mda/0,1607,7-125--212367--,00.html


Basically, I can sell from my house or at the farmer's market if I have less than 3,000 hens and am selling directly to the consumer.  I can sell without being subject to the MDA food safety or egg laws. 
I'm still not sure how the local feed mill can resell eggs unless they're considered a "first receiver" and they're putting the eggs in another carton (repackaging). 

Anyone else know more from experience selling small flock eggs in Michigan?   I'm asking because I can't use a dozen eggs a day from my girls and I have friends lined up to buy them.

Proud mom of 2 US Marines!   Happy care-giver to 11 ISA Brown hens, 2 Buff Orpingtons, and 1 Silver Laced Wyandotte; 1 elderly female Rottweiler who thinks she's a cat, 4 sons who are much taller than I am, the most awesome baby granddaughter alive, and a sweet computer geek husband who broods in front of his laptop and hatches incredible software.
Reply
Proud mom of 2 US Marines!   Happy care-giver to 11 ISA Brown hens, 2 Buff Orpingtons, and 1 Silver Laced Wyandotte; 1 elderly female Rottweiler who thinks she's a cat, 4 sons who are much taller than I am, the most awesome baby granddaughter alive, and a sweet computer geek husband who broods in front of his laptop and hatches incredible software.
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post #3 of 3

Thanks for posting this.  I often find myself with more eggs than I can use, despite sharing them with friends and family!  I've been considering putting out a "fresh eggs" sign, with cartoned eggs in a cooler for maybe $2 a dozen.  I have hesitated, only because I wasn't sure of the rules regarding egg sales.  It would be nice to have my Girls pay for their own feed!

I have six hens, Lucy, Alice (Isa Browns), Harriette, Betty, Opal (Barred Rocks) and Isabelle (Rhode Island Red).
http://trinketsvintagetreasures.blogspot.com/
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I have six hens, Lucy, Alice (Isa Browns), Harriette, Betty, Opal (Barred Rocks) and Isabelle (Rhode Island Red).
http://trinketsvintagetreasures.blogspot.com/
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