BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › How can you tell if a chicken is happy/upset?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How can you tell if a chicken is happy/upset? - Page 3

post #21 of 28

I agree also. Mine, when happy, seem to like to flap their wings and cluck softly among themselves. When impatient or grumpy, they'll whine loudly - a very annoying sound and easily recognisable!! They have learned though that when they whine like this I will usually feed them to shut them up. So they do it more often. lol

post #22 of 28

They are so CUTE when they trill!!!!  I love that sound!!!!  They seem to do that when they are cuddling!!!   smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by epeloquin 
Quote:
Originally Posted by partsRheavy 

They coo, burble and chatter softly when they're happy.  When they're out pecking and scratching they seem happy.

If they feel cold they talk rather loudly before going to bed.

If they go "YIPES!!" or "PEEP_PEEP_SQUEEK" something hurts or is really scary.   It's ~scary~ going into a cage and being MOVED!!!! jumpy 

If they go BAWKBAWK at a time they're NOT laying an egg they're worried about predators or they're wanting to get to a safe roost.


I would agree with this. They tend to be loud (if they aren't laying) and they either want something or are upset. When I go to the run and say "do you girls want to come out and play!?" they all come to the front and skitter back and forth and squawk loudly until I let them out.

When they are happy the description "coo, burble and chatter softly " is perfect. Also, there are times when a couple of my girls will come on my lap and rub their head under my neck/beard and they make a noise called 'trilling' which is a sort of clucky purr. Really cute.

I used to work in an auto parts factory, which is the reason for my handle.  Chickens aren't as heavy, but they're much more entertaining than auto parts!!

Reply

I used to work in an auto parts factory, which is the reason for my handle.  Chickens aren't as heavy, but they're much more entertaining than auto parts!!

Reply
post #23 of 28

I know, the trill is adorable! big_smile
Mine tend to do the trill when they've spotted something alarming or unusual though.
Either that, or I'm invading their personal space when they're laying, they will trill at me too. lol

post #24 of 28

When hens are eating treats they love, they make a "talking with your mouth full" sound, like a "gah" sound.

They purr when happy on the roost.

They smile with their eyes.

They come over and stand next to you.

And more and more!!!!!

Small flock: BAs, 4 EEs, 2 BRs, and 1 Light Brown Leghorn.
Reply
Small flock: BAs, 4 EEs, 2 BRs, and 1 Light Brown Leghorn.
Reply
post #25 of 28

they make a purring sound.

my ameriucana will spend all day chirping and purring like a little song bird.

Hug A Chicken!
Reply
Hug A Chicken!
Reply
post #26 of 28

You just saved my two chickens lives, The sounds of them alerted me to a predator, a rather hungry looking stray cat. Never ever thought that this would be a problem. .. I was just reading about noises trying to interpret the alarm sounds when I went outside to doublecheck. There he was a domestic cat with collar But it crouched down and raced towards them with me in sight..after trying to act "friendly". He knew what she/he wanted t odo. A kinda poofy cat....

post #27 of 28

Purring, soft cooing or chattering, or a big, happy chicken smile. They are usually in a well relaxed state during a smile, and pull up their lower eyelid, which also pulls up their cheeks to a certain point. Since the beak is immobile and fixed, a smile is subtle, and can pass quickly, so can be hard for some people to catch when it's happening.

 

A few examples of chicken smiles:

 

Our little buddy, Big Red rooster, a balanced, hatchery PR male- a hybrid known for throwing aggressive males. He is a great communicator by body language. He knows how to ask for things- for instance, being picked up and treats. A happy fellow.

 

This BCM pullet smiles often.

 

 

Here, she's laying her first egg while her sister was there for support. The pullet cooed and made soothing noises to herself while smiling. If you look close, you can see the sides of her cheeks are pulled up in a big smile. Effervescent and literally glowed with happiness when her egg time finally came. She's like this everytime she lays. Never seen another pullet enjoy the egg laying so much.

 

Our BCM flockmaster. Literally the most gentle and kind alpha male we've had. If speaking to him he smiles in response. He jumps up and down in excitement like a dog when you visit his pen, or share a treat. Crows to you to visit if he sees you walking. He enjoys being held, and the hens seem bonded to him. 

 

If they are squawking, depressed or hunched there is a problem.

I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
Reply
I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
Reply
post #28 of 28
I think my 13 week old chicks are happy and content. Whenever I go out there I say "hi girls" and such and they all come to the fence. I let them out after work even if it's only a short time and sometimes one or 2 will be back in the run. When I have to get them back in they seem to comply easily with the guidance of my rake.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › How can you tell if a chicken is happy/upset?