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year old healthy hens suddenly dying - Page 2

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by janeinboise View Post

Never been wormed,  but poo looks normal, not seeing anything unusual.  Vents appear normal and healthy.  That's why we're so stumped.  So I just checked the ill chicken, and her crop is full...so not digesting properly?  How can I help her...I've gotten her to eat some cooked egg and take a bit of water...vent looks fine. 

You should also get some gloves, KY Jelly and check for a stuck egg/mass, that might be the reason that her crop is not empty.


Edited by casportpony - 5/16/13 at 6:57am
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 

Now that we've sterilized all feeders and cleaned house and run...After some careful observation we discovered that at dusk a large cat was entering the hen house.  It caused quite a ruckus last night, and we are suspicious that it also injured the two banties that died the previous two days - we found them in the morning, in the same place.  I had also noticed that their crumble feeder was knocked over several times in the past week.  Though obvious marks, I suspect that it jumped on them, causing internal damage from which they could not recover.  Needless to say, I'll be trapping cats this week.  There are several  new in the neighborhood that I've seen prowling around.  Operation cat removal starts today. Thanks all for your input.

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddin Fluff View Post

I am no expert but hopefully a bump will help someone else see this.

 

Have they ever been wormed?  Don't know if that would be it.  There are so many possibilities.

Very good point, that could be the problem. I would worm all of them with a broad spectrum wormer.

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by janeinboise View Post

Now that we've sterilized all feeders and cleaned house and run...After some careful observation we discovered that at dusk a large cat was entering the hen house.  It caused quite a ruckus last night, and we are suspicious that it also injured the two banties that died the previous two days - we found them in the morning, in the same place.  I had also noticed that their crumble feeder was knocked over several times in the past week.  Though obvious marks, I suspect that it jumped on them, causing internal damage from which they could not recover.  Needless to say, I'll be trapping cats this week.  There are several  new in the neighborhood that I've seen prowling around.  Operation cat removal starts today. Thanks all for your input.

I hope you also dusted or sprayed for mites/lice with a proper dust or spray, DE does not work.

post #15 of 20

FYI, your ill chicken, the one that has a full crop, her problems have *nothing* nothing to do with cats.

post #16 of 20

Pale combs and respiratory difficulty could be a few things. Chicks carry prenatal immunity for about 3 weeks. After that it is up to nature and the person taking responsibility for providing proper nutrients and medication if needed. It sounds like an anemic condition. When red blood cell deficiency takes place birds get pale, lack energy, lose weight, and die. Red blood cells are vital because they transport oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from the tissues of the body. Without oxygen, there can be no breakdown of of nutrients into energy. Without energy, the chicken can't maintain normal body functions, can't utilize its feed and will die.

 

Red blood cells are created in the bone marrow made up of B-12, protein, and iron. Hemoglobin is comprised of protein which gives blood the red color. Hemoglobin is what retains oxygen while it is transported through the body. Since red blood cells only live about 35 days, they need to be replenished by nutrients. In the bone marrow the B-12, Iron, protein, etc., are put together to form a new red blood cell. Nature isn't perfect, and iron that doesn't make it back to bone marrow, old ones aren't returned to the spleen, then get passed in droppings. Not all feeds are formulated properly either. Thinking about this gives realization as to why we replenish diets by supplementation of nutrients.

 

Anemia, whether it is caused vitamin/mineral deficiency or external/internal parasites show the same symptoms. Many people don't realize that just because there is no blood in droppings does not mean coccidiosis is not the problem. From at least a month old to 9-10 months, birds should be treated for coccidiosis.

 

Worms also cause anemic problems since they steal vital nutrients from a chicken that create red blood cells. When chickens have access to a variety of insects, earthworms, slugs, snails, wild bird droppings it is not uncommon to worm every month.

 

So, without going on about this, when a bird shows anemic symptoms, treat for coccidiosis, then worms, then external parasites like lice/mites, then supplement with vitamins, minerals, and probiotics. I'm sorry some of your chickens died. We should all desire to learn more to keep our birds healthy, and no one knows everything, so we strive for more knowledge. That way we can help each other while cutting out the numerous misinformation often presented in regard to poultry. Without the balance of nutrients and required medication for specific diseases, there will only be higher incidences of mortality. People should also demand high quality feeds put out by responsible formulators and boycott the mass produced garbage.
 

The Status Quo always sucks!

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The Status Quo always sucks!

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post #17 of 20

Michael Apple, said " People should also demand high quality feeds put out by responsible formulators and boycott the mass produced garbage".

Hi,

so I try my best to get good feed.

but how do I know I am not buying garbage ??

 

Thanks.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mg15 View Post

Michael Apple, said " People should also demand high quality feeds put out by responsible formulators and boycott the mass produced garbage".

Hi,

so I try my best to get good feed.

but how do I know I am not buying garbage ??

 

Thanks.


Pay attention to what feed mills are subject to recalls, for example: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm313507.htm

A couple examples would be Purina and Dumor (no, I don't care if that hurts their feelings or any feed store that carries any of their low quality, cheaply formulated product).

 

Read and understand the necessary nutrients, required medications which target disease by accepting the knowledge put forth by University Departments of Poultry Husbandry and the professors who conduct/provide information on feed trials as proof. A few books are Poultry Husbandry by Jull, and Feeding Poultry by Heuser.

 

Read the feed tags on a poultry ration. Know what to ask in regard to specific nutrients if you decide to contact a feed formulator at a feed mill company.

 

Eliminate the misinformation put forth from numerous websites with no foundation to back up their claims.

 

Consult with Merck Veterinary manuals.

The Status Quo always sucks!

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The Status Quo always sucks!

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post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 

I've kept chickens for 20 years. The 4 panties that died had free range of the back yard. The 2 standards do not. They eat the same food, use same waterers and all sleep together in the same coop.  The 2 standards are healthy and normal.  My bitty girls all got sick in the same manner:  no symptoms then pale comb and very sick {lethargic} then death in a matter of hours. 2 had no crop issues. 1 not sure. 1 idefinitely did.  I've not experienced this before so it is a mystery to us.  Most ofour chicken deaths are from cats and hawks. We work hard to keep a clean healthy coop and yard don't use chemicals etc.  No issues with food that we can see. We really are sad and mystified.

post #20 of 20

Animal Health Laboratories

 
2230 Old Penitentiary Road   Phone: 208-332-8570
P.O. Box 7249   Fax: 208-334-4619
Boise, ID 83712    

Open Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Closed on State holidays

The Idaho Department of Agriculture Animal Health Laboratory is a multi-faceted laboratory network with the main emphasis of conducting Regulatory and Certification testing of animals and animal products, as well as, the diagnosis and control of animal diseases. The laboratory provides support services for the Division of Animal Industries and provides training in a variety of testing techniques and procedures. The Animal Health Laboratory oversees a number of state and federal programs including the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP), the Salmonella Enteritidis Monitoring Program, the Johne's Program, and the Trichomoniasis Certification and Proficiency Testing Program. The laboratory provides support and consultation services to a variety of other public and private agencies, including the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services and the World Center for Birds of Prey. The Animal Health Laboratory is a regional testing center for a number of states in the western United States and participates on a federal task force for the control and eradication of foreign animal diseases.

The laboratory complex consists of a number of individual, self-contained laboratory units with dedicated and defined purposes, and a variety of specific tests or types of testing performed therein. A brief description of each laboratory section follows:

Market Cattle Inspection Laboratory (MCI):
(Federal & State Cooperative Program)

This laboratory collects blood samples and identifications from all animals in the state of Idaho that go through meat processing plants for food purposes. The blood samples are sorted, the identifications computerized and the blood samples are tested for the requested Brucellosis diseases.

Brucellosis Laboratory:
(Federal & State Cooperative Program)

This is a federal laboratory dedicated to the eradication of brucellosis in the United States. A large percentage of cattle and hogs sold, slaughtered or exported/imported into Idaho are tested for brucellosis.

Serology Laboratory:

This laboratory tests animal serum samples for a great variety of diseases in preparation for live animals being exported/imported throughout the world or for diagnostic reasons. The serology lab performs testing to meet requirements for fairs, shows, sales, horse races, breeding, etc.

Virology Laboratory:

The virology laboratory performs numerous tests to determine the presence of viral diseases in animals.

West Nile Virus Laboratory:

This laboratory was set up especially for testing horse serum for the West Nile Virus. The state of Idaho found its first positive horse in 2004.

PCR Laboratory:

This laboratory offers Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) testing which is highly specific for diseases for which PCR assays have been developed. We are offering PCR testing for Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus I and II; Trichomonas foetus; JOHNE's direct PCR testing for the detection of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) DNA in bovine feces; and JOHNE's pooled fecal PCR testing.

Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory:

Performs bacterial isolation (culture) on animal tissues along with antimicrobial susceptibility on bacterial isolates for companion and food animals.

Rabies Laboratory:

In cooperation with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Bureau of Laboratories, brain tissues are removed from animal heads and tissues are released to the Bureau of Laboratories for rabies testing. No whole bodies over 20lbs will be accepted. No whole SKUNK bodies will be accepted.

Trichomoniasis Laboratory:

This lab provides Trichomonas culturing and PCR services for cattle producers throughout the state of Idaho and many surrounding states. This laboratory is the state reference laboratory for Trichomonad organism identification. This laboratory provides training and certification to veterinarians, veterinary clinics and laboratories throughout the state that conduct bull sampling and Trichomonad culture for the State Trichomoniasis Program.

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Edited by casportpony - 5/19/13 at 6:30am
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