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Introducing chicks to adults - Page 2

post #11 of 16
I think a lot of it depends on the chickens ... I introduced 6 new 8 weeks old chicks to my hens, let them roam around the run and coop all day with me nearby. My hens didn't seem to care one bit. They are currently all asleep in the coop locked in for the night. I'm still watching just in case a hen gets grumpy but so far it is completely not what I was expecting...




Edited by chickiechick12 - 1/31/16 at 5:27pm
My family + 3 Buff Orpingtons + 3 Black Australorps + 3 Plymouth Barred Rocks + 2 Silkies living in New Hampshire
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My family + 3 Buff Orpingtons + 3 Black Australorps + 3 Plymouth Barred Rocks + 2 Silkies living in New Hampshire
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post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by azygous View Post

If chicks have what I like to call a "panic room", where only they can fit the entrances (and there should be more than one), it not only provides optimal safety, but it helps develop self confidence in the chicks so they're better adjusted going forward.

Food and water is inside this panic room so the chicks don't have to be stressed and fearful trying to compete for essentials. It's a place for them to relax and be themselves without having to be on guard all the time.

Almost eight years ago, when I was introducing my first three baby chicks to my two adult hens, I quickly came to the conclusion I needed some sort of safe pen for the babies if only to keep the adult hens from taking over the chicks' food. I tacked up a small enclosure in one corner of the run, and made a small opening into it that the hens couldn't fit through. By that time one hen had developed a real fondness for the chick food and I found her stuck in the opening leisurely finishing off the chick starter. So I tore the pen down and built a larger enclosure so I could get the food farther away from the openings.

Later on, I built a new run and incorporated a chick pen or panic room into it as a permanent feature. Then I created small chick portals in every partition in the run where a chick might get trapped against a wall or stuck in a corner with no escape. This provides safety for baby chicks so they can have free access to the entire run and still have a safe place that they can use until they're around three months old. Currently, I'm using the panic room for a two-year old abandoned hen I just adopted, so it's anything but wasted space.

Everyone who utilizes a panic room for their chicks have had peace of mind and no casualties. I highly recommend it.




A detail worth discussing is the opening chicks use to go between adult area and their own. There may be tricks to it that promote more fluid movement back and forth by chicks. It has been some time since I kept broods in close confinement with adults that are not kin but it did involve something that approached a creep feeder setup like used with cattle. Chicks could enter and leave around entire perimeter of adult enclosure. I will try to make something similar using wooden dowels.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.

 

 

Reminder to self: August 2021 Check Post #15852 in Show Off Your American Gamefowl

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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.

 

 

Reminder to self: August 2021 Check Post #15852 in Show Off Your American Gamefowl

Reply
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by centrarchid View Post
 
 
A detail worth discussing is the opening chicks use to go between adult area and their own. There may be tricks to it that promote more fluid movement back and forth by chicks. It has been some time since I kept broods in close confinement with adults that are not kin but it did involve something that approached a creep feeder setup like used with cattle. Chicks could enter and leave around entire perimeter of adult enclosure. I will try to make something similar using wooden dowels.

I've thought about this........my partition wall has a solid bottom panel that could be installed at any height

Would give chicks more options of escape than just one or two doors, that could be 'sentry blocked' by aggressive older birds.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 16
Placement of common resource such as feeder or water important as well. Once adults have eaten to capacity they loose interest in driving younger birds for feeder. To reduce further the adults inclination to drive younger birds away have the feeder close to the semi-permeable barrier the chicks use. Then chicks will feel more comfortable to approach.


Roosting arrangements can be a challenge as well. What I used to do was have adults roost in a location they where thoroughly used to. Then when younger birds are expected to use the same general location and have inclination to roost up, then I setup a new roost several feet away from the existing roost and a little lower. Adults will settle on their established roost first then younger birds come in a little later to their roost with little or no aggression for elders.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.

 

 

Reminder to self: August 2021 Check Post #15852 in Show Off Your American Gamefowl

Reply

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.

 

 

Reminder to self: August 2021 Check Post #15852 in Show Off Your American Gamefowl

Reply
post #15 of 16

i have 37 hems that were started by some one else i did not start this flock but i want to expand  ...will adults pic at new chick ??

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaderic View Post

i have 37 hems that were started by some one else i did not start this flock but i want to expand  ...will adults pic at new chick ??
They will to some degree, but if they become familiar with them through a fence first it will make the introduction easier. So plan on a temporary pen to house new ones in either next to or within your coop for a couple of weeks, after your chicks are fully feathered, around 8-10 weeks of age.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
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