BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Winter is here and the chickens won't go to bed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Winter is here and the chickens won't go to bed - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Also check for signs of mice or rats. And make sure your roosts are comfortable.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

It's just a little string of LED Christmas lights in a jar to put some light in the coop. I didn't start doing it until they had been staying out at night for awhile (it was an attempt to lure them back in at night :)). There's nothing else inside the coop - it's built for just the 4 girls I have so it's not very big and I rake their bedding around every day, so I don't think anyone else is living in there. I've blocked off their access to the space under the coop for now and that seems to be directing them back inside. I might just have to leave it that way for a few weeks.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by supchicks View Post
 

It's just a little string of LED Christmas lights in a jar to put some light in the coop. I didn't start doing it until they had been staying out at night for awhile (it was an attempt to lure them back in at night :)). There's nothing else inside the coop - it's built for just the 4 girls I have so it's not very big and I rake their bedding around every day, so I don't think anyone else is living in there. I've blocked off their access to the space under the coop for now and that seems to be directing them back inside. I might just have to leave it that way for a few weeks.

Maybe it's too small and it's stuffy and crowded in there?

Are the lights on all the time?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 16

How much light comes from this string of lights in a jar?  I was thinking you had regular lights.  Chickens can't see in the dark.  As the sun is setting, does it go behind a building or hill or something that cast a shadow onto the coop before the rest of the yard gets dark?  Maybe by the time its dark enough for the birds to want to go inside, its already too dark in the coop for them to find the roost.  Even though the sun always sets in the west, it doesn't set in the exact same place all year so this may only be a problem in the winter. 

No other animal works this hard to crap in its own drinking water.

Reply

No other animal works this hard to crap in its own drinking water.

Reply
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hmm, these are some interesting theories. I think the chickens can see fairly well - there are windows on both sides of the coop so a good amount of light comes in and the little lights in the jar are nicely dim. The lights go off after a few hours (awesome little built in timer - love the dollar store!). Since blocking off the space under the coop, they've been going to bed without fuss. Maybe if I leave it blocked off until the spring they'll get the hint. 

 

Thanks for all the suggestions!

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by supchicks View Post
 

Hmm, these are some interesting theories. I think the chickens can see fairly well - there are windows on both sides of the coop so a good amount of light comes in and the little lights in the jar are nicely dim. The lights go off after a few hours (awesome little built in timer - love the dollar store!). Since blocking off the space under the coop, they've been going to bed without fuss. Maybe if I leave it blocked off until the spring they'll get the hint. 

 

Thanks for all the suggestions!

There you go!

Chickens can form some odd 'habits', you just have to manipulate their environment to create new habits.

I'd leave the block up for a few weeks, then remove it and see what they do...by then the new habit of roosting in the coop should be set.

Being observant, flexible and willing to experiment will teach you much.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Winter is here and the chickens won't go to bed