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hydroponic fodder systems and sorghum

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Is sorghum good or bad to sprouts as some websites mention it as dangerous and others talk about how they feed them to animals all the time. And is it possible to only feed chickens on sprouting and what sprouts can be a source of calcium. Thank you for answers.
post #2 of 8

I use sorghum for poultry pasture.

It is not possible to only feed sprouts. Chickens are omnivores so sprouts alone would be deficient in some vitamins, minerals but most importantly, several essential amino acids.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
So then what is the fuss, as some people say that the sprouts produce a sort of cyanide thing. Is that just a myth. Remember that this is not for pasture but rather for growing the sprouts in a machine. Thabks for your input though.
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Oh and... is there no grain mix to sprout that provides all necessary nutrients for the chickens?
post #5 of 8

On the first point, I don't know. Sorghum is a seed often used for pasture in game plots. I doubt there is a difference whether it is just sprouted or growing in the ground. I could be wrong.

 

On the second point. You are absolutely correct. There is no grain one can feed, ferment or sprout that will provide all the nutrients chickens are known to need.

 

As omnivores, chickens have always eaten all types of bugs as well as frogs, mice, etc.. This is the animal protein that omnivores need. Animal protein contains all the essential amino acids needed in the diet. Vegetable protein will always be incomplete in essential amino acids. Many manufacturers make vegetable based feed, they can do so by adding synthetic amino acids like lysine, methionine and sometimes threonine and tryptophan. Whatever is missing in the grains/legumes they're using as the base for the feed.


Edited by ChickenCanoe - 3/25/16 at 1:53pm

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thank you for answering. I am still open to other suggestions.
post #7 of 8

There are no studies on feeding sorghum grass and or sprouts to poultry and so it would be hard to say what the outcome would be.

 I myself wouldn't take the chance in feeding it.

Below is a quote from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affaires (OMAFRA) on feeding sorghum grass to cattle. 

 

Quote:

 
Members of the Sorghum family contain dhurrin, a glucoside that breaks down to release hydrocyanic acid also known as prussic acid. A sudden disruption of growth such as frost, drought or cutting, causes prussic acid to be released inside the plant at a more rapid rate. High prussic acid levels may be lethal to cattle. Prussic acid will breakdown in one to two weeks, so material made into hay or silage is safe to use. See Nutritional Concerns and Animal Health Hazards, below

 

Below is a quote from University of Wisconsin-Extension Cooperative Extension (UWEX) on feeding sorghum grass to cattle and sheep.    

 

Quote:

Young plants, including roots, and leaves of older plants contain a compound called dhurrin which can break down to release a substance called prussic acid or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Sudangrass has low levels of this compound and rarely kills animals. Sorghum has the highest levels and sorghum-sudangrasses are intermediate. There is also considerable varietal difference in prussic acid content for all types of sorghums.

This compound is highest in young plants. Therefore the recommendation is not to graze or cut for green chop until the plant is 18 to 20 inches tall. It is important to watch for young regrowth in pastures. After a drought, new shoots may appear and the cattle will switch from the taller forage to the new tender shoots. Also do not graze or green chop for 10 days after a killing frost.

High levels of nitrogen fertilizer will increase the likelihood of prussic acid poisoning as well as nitrate poisoning. Very dark green plant growth often contains higher levels of prussic acid.

Most prussic acid is lost during the curing process. Therefore hay and silage are seldom toxic even if the original forage was. Do not leave green chop in a wagon over night and then feed. The heat that occurs will cause a release of prussic and make the feed more likely to be toxic.

Individual animals vary in susceptibility to prussic acid poisoning. Cattle are more susceptible than sheep. Animals receiving grain with the pasture are less likely to be affected.


Edited by Chris09 - 3/26/16 at 8:10am

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Yeah thats a loooot for that info I will definitely not try it with those risks.
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