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New batch, a few questions

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I just received my new batch of chicks from Ideal. My 1st time to mail order chicks. Ordered 7 coo coo Moran pullets. 7 DOMINIQUE pullet. And 2 males. Maybe it was 4. But I got 28. 14 of each. I have already lost 2 of the Moran babies. So now 26. One had been pecked. So I separated everybody into some bigger boxes. Next day, I lost the 2nd Moran chick to what I think was pasties. I have now carefully cleaned all their little butts. They are under heat lamps at close to 90 degrees. (95 seemed to hot), water and vitemin chick starter is available.. They are inside,

Any further thought ideas or suggestions?

post #2 of 5

I am guessing you may not have enough room in your containers for so many chicks, and that's why you're losing some.

 

While it's true chicks need it to be around 85-90F under a heat source during their first week, they also need enough space in the brooder to have a second temperature zone of around 70-75F. If your brooder is too small, some of the chicks are going to suffer overheating because it's too crowded for them to reach a cool space in which to cool down. They literally cook in place.

 

It's like if you were in a dense crowd around a bonfire and the crowds keep you from being able to move away from the fire when you start to get too hot. You'd be trapped, and you'd overheat and get sick. This is what happens to some chicks in a crowded brooder.

 

So many people think the brooder has to be 90F all over when it only needs to be 90F directly under the heat source. Chicks self regulate by moving from the heated zone to warm up, and then moving to a cooler zone to cool down. Make sure they have adequate space in which to do this.

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks. Ill measure the temp in the far corner now that I know what it should be. 24 hours with no more losses so far, I don't think my brooders are any more crowded then the one I see at Tractor supply where they sell the chicks. This will all change as they grow bigger. I have a larger box, that will go outside on the grass, or in the garage on cement. It is open on the bottom, Perhaps at 3 or 4 weeks. Thanks for the advice.

post #4 of 5

Hah! No one should go by what they see in a feed store. Those employees most of them, let alone their supervisors, don't understand the first thing about chicks. Typically, the boss asks who knows anything about chickens and one will raise their hand and reply, "My family had them when I was little." And that qualifies them to be put in charge of caring for the babies when they come in.

 

This last year, when I went to pick up my chicks at the post office, there was a huge shipment for Big R, the local feed store. Well, come to find out, those chicks sat there in the post office for the next 24 hours before an employee was dispatched to pick them up. Little wonder people buy chicks that end up dying soon after they bring them home.

 

The chicks you see in a crowded stock tank at a feed store are not being kept properly at all. I was just in Big R last week, and the chicks were crammed in small stock tanks and had barely enough room to move. I wouldn't get chicks at Big R again if you gave them to me for nothing.

post #5 of 5

Large plastic totes or cardboard boxes work well. Just hang the light on one end and they'll self regulate temp. Move to where they are comfortable. For birds under a week of age I keep the feed and water in middle as they stick close to heat. There after the feed and water are put on far end of brooder. I got lucky in that where I live now there was a few livestock water troughs that make great brooders. Well, same as in a feed store chick bin. Those hold a lot of chicks until they start growing. Late in season now so will have chicks outside in 3 weeks.

 

When I purchased from feed stores back in the day I'd wait a few days after chicks arrived. It ensures your getting healthy birds. There is stress and some death involved with shipping, few days after arrival and you know the birds are in perfect health.

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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