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black sex link?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone, I live 20 miles north of green bay Wisconsin. I've read many forums over the last year from back yard chickens and finally decided to become a member.

Recently we decided to hatch some of our own chick's from our flock. I've done a lot of reading on arcing chick's and can't find much on crossing our breeds.

We have a black copper Maran roster
8 barred plymouth rocks, 3 buff orpingtons, and 4 black australorps.

My questions are:
1- does the sex link trait work with the orps? (I know it does with the rocks, being most info I've read use the barred plymouth rock as the hen in examples, however none I've read use the black cooper Maran, mostly the Rhode Island red)

2. Is there a way too determine sec by traits in the black austalorps eggs using the black cooper Maran?

3. Most talk about the white spot on the head being the cockerele, I'll try and post pics of my chick's, but these are bigger than just spots. All chick's so far have all the same characteristics between may would be the males and the females. Males white on head with lighter beaks, females all black with black beaks. (Hope i didn't screw that up. We had 2 birds that came out of lighter shells and smaller that i think are the orpington's ends, the chick's were light tan with a yellowish tint, but both died within 12 hours of hatch. Weak from the start.
Or would those be from the australorps? It's crazy all 10 survivors seem to all have same characteristics even though the different breeds of hens.
post #2 of 3
1- does the sex link trait work with the orps? (I know it does with the rocks, being most info I've read use the barred plymouth rock as the hen in examples, however none I've read use the black cooper Maran, mostly the Rhode Island red)
Color sexlinks, both red and black, are largely determined by the hen's genetics. For black sexlinks, you need to have the barring gene. A barred hen can only pass that barring gene to her male chicks. This is why you can be sure that any chicks with a white spot on the back of the head are male. Red sexlinks need a silver-base color hen and a red/gold base color rooster. The silver hen can only pass her 'silver' gene to her male chicks, and the red rooster's genetics will make seeing the differences between the sexes colors easier. Buff Orpingtons aren't barred or silver, so no sexlinking there. The Australorps may have silver, but their extended black gene hides the base color completely, and the Black Copper rooster will produce chicks with dark down, making seeing the base color nearly impossible until they feather in and show 'leakage.'
2. Is there a way too determine sec by traits in the black austalorps eggs using the black cooper Maran?
Nope. You just have to wait and see what develops.
3. Most talk about the white spot on the head being the cockerele, I'll try and post pics of my chick's, but these are bigger than just spots. All chick's so far have all the same characteristics between may would be the males and the females. Males white on head with lighter beaks, females all black with black beaks. (Hope i didn't screw that up. We had 2 birds that came out of lighter shells and smaller that i think are the orpington's ends, the chick's were light tan with a yellowish tint, but both died within 12 hours of hatch. Weak from the start.
Or would those be from the australorps? It's crazy all 10 survivors seem to all have same characteristics even though the different breeds of hens.
With the black sexlink cockerels, it doesn't matter how big, or small the white spot is. If it's there, it's a male. End of story.
Australorps are extended black, and it's a very dominant gene. The light chicks were likely from the Orpington hens. Barred Rocks are also extended black, with the barring gene on top of the solid black. It makes sense that those breeds would produce similar chicks. The Marans rooster has white skin, which is dominant over yellow, so all the chicks should also have white/pink skin instead of yellow. All your breeds are single combed, so again, you are going to produce only single comb chicks.
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Excellent answer! That explains it better than most articles I've read even from Universities! Thank you for the explanation!
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