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how long do eggs last in the fridge?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I heard it was only about a week...is that true?

post #2 of 23

Good Heavens no.  Store bought eggs are a week old before they hit the grocery store shelves in many cases.  Mother Earth News did a storage experiment a while back and on average, if I remember correctly, it was MONTHS before eggs went bad under refrigeration.  You can keep eggs on your counter, without refrigeration, for a week and still expect them to be good. 

When in doubt just put them through the water test before use, but they definitely keep more than a week.

I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.   - E.B. White

 

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt

 

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I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.   - E.B. White

 

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt

 

The best way to be missed when you're gone is to stand for something while you're here. - Seth Godin

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post #3 of 23

The date on the carton of grocery store eggs is 45 days after they were packaged.  There is a YouTube video about that... I'll try to find it and edit this if I do.

Here it is...  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzznB6mPB70&feature=channel


Edited by Robin'sBrood - 9/27/10 at 1:10pm
Robin's brood = 1  wonderful husband, 4 handsome sons, 1 beautiful daughter, 14 chickens, 1 dog, 1 puppy, 2 rabbits, 3 gerbils, & 1 dwarf hamster... shew! 
<>< http://matthewmcgee.org/roman-rd.html  <><
<>< http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsgwfliQoqg <><
<>< http://www.shorewoodbiblechurch.org/where.htm <><
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Robin's brood = 1  wonderful husband, 4 handsome sons, 1 beautiful daughter, 14 chickens, 1 dog, 1 puppy, 2 rabbits, 3 gerbils, & 1 dwarf hamster... shew! 
<>< http://matthewmcgee.org/roman-rd.html  <><
<>< http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsgwfliQoqg <><
<>< http://www.shorewoodbiblechurch.org/where.htm <><
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post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

My eggs are fresh...I thought there was a difference from store bought.

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by xheatherrr3 

My eggs are fresh...I thought there was a difference from store bought.


They all come from a chicken's butt.  wink

The only difference is in the treatment, environment and diet of the hen -- which can change the composition of the egg, such as the nutritional profile -- but eggs are eggs are eggs as far as preservation goes.  If anything eggs from the backyard have an advantage over store bought.  1) They don't spend the first week or so of their existence in transit and more days thereafter on a store shelf or in a storage cooler.  2) Backyard eggs can be stored without washing, the natural bloom has been shown to keep them fresher longer.

I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.   - E.B. White

 

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt

 

The best way to be missed when you're gone is to stand for something while you're here. - Seth Godin

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I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.   - E.B. White

 

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt

 

The best way to be missed when you're gone is to stand for something while you're here. - Seth Godin

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post #6 of 23

Yesterday I bought some free range organic chicken eggs from the nutrition department and cooked one up side by side with one from my recently started laying pullet. 

The whites were noticeably watery/less firm due to age of the store bought egg, and was bigger.  Mine were only a few days old on the counter top and can clearly see the two different whites, with the inner white significantly raised. 

Cooked (had it over rice), they were both good, finishing the store bought egg first.  The store bough egg had more whites to eat, but what put the nail in the coffin was the yolk from the back yard egg.  Even though the yolk wasn't as big as the other free range egg, there was much more richness in color, taste and mouth feel to blow the other egg out of my mind as it glazed over the rice.

Ai-chan (RIR), Ruby (BA), and Lulu (BO).
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Ai-chan (RIR), Ruby (BA), and Lulu (BO).
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post #7 of 23

I remember some years ago Eggland Best was coming out with their commercial on how better they were than other eggs.  My husband turned to me and commented how my chicken's eggs looked a whole lot better then theirs.  How the yolks from my chickens were much more deeper in color and firmer ect.  Mine were truly free range eggs, not sure on Eggland Best.

post #8 of 23

There is no need to keep eggs in the refrigerator either. If the bloom is intact then the egg will be fine for weeks without refrigeration.

A forgetfulness support thread http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=465717
 2011 was the coldest summer in Western Washington's recorded history that started in 1891. Uf Da!!!

June 2012 was the coldest June in recorded history. I need some sun. 

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A forgetfulness support thread http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=465717
 2011 was the coldest summer in Western Washington's recorded history that started in 1891. Uf Da!!!

June 2012 was the coldest June in recorded history. I need some sun. 

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post #9 of 23

Between selling and eating our eggs don't last long enough to test. Some folks are buying 4 doz at a time to take home to neigbors who ask them to pick a dozen up for them. So I guess suburbia is finding out what we already know. We do keep ours on the counter and refrigerate for selling.

WHY DOES LIFE SEEM TO GET IN THE WAY OF LIVING?

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WHY DOES LIFE SEEM TO GET IN THE WAY OF LIVING?

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post #10 of 23

I once ate an egg that had been in my fridge for about 4 months and it was still good. It was my last egg from my black star that passed away in mid-March and I ate the egg in mid-July. I always gather my eggs every day and put them the fridge right away and I almost never wash them. If one is reallllly dirty I'll wash it, but then I make sure I use it before the others that haven't been washed.

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"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." - Anatole France

Follow our country adventures at "Our Neck of the Woods" - http://ourneckofthewoods.net

Like us on Facebook for blog updates in your news feed - https://www.facebook.com/baranifarm

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