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Moving Chickens?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

This summer we are planning on moving from Texas to Idaho and really wanted to bring along our six hens.  The closer it gets the more I am thinking it's just not possible.  Anyone moved chickens a good distance before - like a road trip lasting more than one day?  I REALLY want to keep my little ladies!

post #2 of 19

I would assume it is possible, since birds can be shipped in the mail in shipping boxes and make it alive. On the ground you can even feed and water them!

Need egg candling reference pics? Click HERE!
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I'm no expert, there is always something to learn, and my birds are livestock, so... yes, I may be quite blunt. wink.png

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Need egg candling reference pics? Click HERE!
2011 Coop build! Click Here!

 

I'm no expert, there is always something to learn, and my birds are livestock, so... yes, I may be quite blunt. wink.png

Reply
post #3 of 19

Cat carriers with feed dishes and add nipple waterers. Then you are good to go.

"If you want to be happy for a year, win the lottery. If you want to be happy for a lifetime, love what you do."
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
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"If you want to be happy for a year, win the lottery. If you want to be happy for a lifetime, love what you do."
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
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post #4 of 19

We are moving in April, only 7-8 hours away, but i am bringing everyone - cats, fish, chickens.  i will house them in travel cages or crates, with fruit and cucumber pieces for moisture.  Then when we stop for breaks i will put in water dishes for drinks.  Also heard that if you cover the cages they will think it's night time and calm down. 

i could not imagine leaving any of my kids, so plan on making this work. i'm more worried about my tropical fish than my chickens, but found a battery operated filter, so hoping that keeps them afloat.

Looking forward to reading advice from other folks.  Good luck to you!

Colleen
EE, Silkies, Showgirls, Bantam Cochin, WCB Polish, D'Anver, Porcelain D'Uccle, Bantam Salmon Faverolle, some interesting mixes, Nigerian Dwarf Goats, Persians, Ducks.

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Colleen
EE, Silkies, Showgirls, Bantam Cochin, WCB Polish, D'Anver, Porcelain D'Uccle, Bantam Salmon Faverolle, some interesting mixes, Nigerian Dwarf Goats, Persians, Ducks.

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post #5 of 19

They'll be fine. Just put them in a carrier or two big enough for them and when you do rest stops offer them food or water. If they can be shipped as adults without food or water for one or two days, your ladies will be fine! big_smile

~Madison~
Yes. My icon is of a chicken shooting a rainbow laser out of its eye.
I win.
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~Madison~
Yes. My icon is of a chicken shooting a rainbow laser out of its eye.
I win.
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post #6 of 19

I agree. Poultry exhibitors travel with their birds frequently. Although occasional mishaps occur, by and large
their are few problems if some good planning and common sense are used.

You don't want carriers which are too big, just enough room for them to stand up if needed. The more space that they have, the more distance to travel, and momentum to build up, to smash into the side of the crate if you need to hit the brakes for some reason.

They don't need feed and water while you're moving. In most cases they won't even bother with it until you stop. Twice a day is more than enough, even one will be OK. Some people travel 2 days to a show without stopping to feed and water.

The nipple waterers is a good idea, but just make sure that you've used them with the birds for at least a week or two, so that they recognize them as a water source, and learn how to use them properly. You don't want to have them full while you're on the road. The constant movement causes continuous dripping, and the last thing that you want is wet bedding with no way to replace it. It might just be easier to use open dishes when you stop.

The most important issue is to be careful of summer heat in an enclosed vehicle, if you stop to eat, etc, just like you would for a dog. Cracking the window a bit is not going to do it.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

The heat is my biggest fear - like when stopping for meals/hotels.  I hadn't thought of the nipple thing - I'm gonna give it a try!  Thanks!

post #8 of 19

I would check with every state and find out about interstate traffic of poultry and agricultural animals.   Between Nevada and CA on Hwy 80 there is a checkpoint that you have to stop at and say whether or not you have produce or animals.    I would hate for you to get half way there and have to surrender them for some quarentine or something!!

Proud Mama of 4 Lav Orps, 2 BCM, 7 EE, 4 BR, 6 LB, 4 Aus, 1 Wel, 4 BO, 12 WH, 4 runners, 4 Alpaca, 1 chinchilla, 1 Sheltie, 1 Pom, 2 Jap Chin/Maltese, 2 girls and 1 boy.

1Co 12:26  If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together.
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Proud Mama of 4 Lav Orps, 2 BCM, 7 EE, 4 BR, 6 LB, 4 Aus, 1 Wel, 4 BO, 12 WH, 4 runners, 4 Alpaca, 1 chinchilla, 1 Sheltie, 1 Pom, 2 Jap Chin/Maltese, 2 girls and 1 boy.

1Co 12:26  If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together.
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post #9 of 19

I moved from California to Oklahoma and brought 9 domestic birds....african gray, 2 conures, 3 love birds, 2 finches, and a canary. I had them in various smaller cages in the back of my Matrix. I covered the cages with shade cloth. I brought them into the hotel room with me. It was a two day trip. All is well.  smile

Ruled by a black lab, english pointer, 2 doxies, 9 domestic birds, and 3 desert toirtoises, and now (25) 24 "overrun with eggs" hens and 1 roo.
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Ruled by a black lab, english pointer, 2 doxies, 9 domestic birds, and 3 desert toirtoises, and now (25) 24 "overrun with eggs" hens and 1 roo.
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post #10 of 19

I would check with every state and find out about interstate traffic of poultry and agricultural animals.   Between Nevada and CA on Hwy 80 there is a checkpoint that you have to stop at and say whether or not you have produce or animals.    I would hate for you to get half way there and have to surrender them for some quarentine or something!!


I did check before I moved. I think going into California is where most of the checkpoints are. Definately check the route you plan to take.

Ruled by a black lab, english pointer, 2 doxies, 9 domestic birds, and 3 desert toirtoises, and now (25) 24 "overrun with eggs" hens and 1 roo.
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Ruled by a black lab, english pointer, 2 doxies, 9 domestic birds, and 3 desert toirtoises, and now (25) 24 "overrun with eggs" hens and 1 roo.
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