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how much to charge for eggs? - Page 3

post #21 of 57
Assuming you want to make a profit and not just break even, there is always the LITTLE KNOWN, "Fibonacci Ratio." It has been used for centuries by the few who understand it.
For eggs, it is very simple to use. Just determine your total cost per dozen eggs produced, and multiply by 1.618.

Thats it. 1.618. Easy as pie.

This will give you an assured profit, taking into account all factors for you. No more worrying about the vagaries of your market, or other unknowns. The mystery is lifted.

It's the Holy Grail of egg pricing.

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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post #22 of 57

I wash our eggs and weigh them on a little cheapo digital postal scale.  After the eggs that  we use and give to family and friends, my wife sells about 8-10 dozen brown eggs per week at her work.

 

Small/Medium (under 56 grams) $1.50 per doz.

Large (56-63 grams) $2.00 per doz.

XL/Jumbo (over 63 grams) $2.50 per doz.

 

I see adds on Craigslist in this area (Northern Michigan) usually in the 2-3 dollar range.

 

Friends, family, and customers have provided us with plenty of empty cartons.

post #23 of 57

My customers are getting a sweet deal. $2.00 doz. for large eggs, different shades of brown, and at least 1  large blue egg in the carton, usually. My hens free range but I don't feed them organic feed or treats. 

 

I had to laugh, a customer brought me some egg cartons, on them it said "From vegetarian chickens kept with roosters" $4.50 doz.

They're charging more for that? I didn't think chickens wanted to be vegetarinas...My chickens definately are not vegetarians! lol! And I can't tell which eggs are fertilized and which aren't....?

I guess the bottome line is, they're worth what someones willing to pay. I might try the "What will you give me" route.

Crazy is, as crazy does. 

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Crazy is, as crazy does. 

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post #24 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by yinzerchick View Post

My customers are getting a sweet deal. $2.00 doz. for large eggs, different shades of brown, and at least 1  large blue egg in the carton, usually. My hens free range but I don't feed them organic feed or treats. 

 

I had to laugh, a customer brought me some egg cartons, on them it said "From vegetarian chickens kept with roosters" $4.50 doz.

They're charging more for that? I didn't think chickens wanted to be vegetarinas...My chickens definately are not vegetarians! lol! And I can't tell which eggs are fertilized and which aren't....?

I guess the bottome line is, they're worth what someones willing to pay. I might try the "What will you give me" route.

That is a steal, @ $2 a dozen. Go with 'Country Fresh Eggs, Wholesome and Delicious'... and charge $4!
 

 

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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post #25 of 57

The normal charge rate is $2.50-$3.00

Proud owner of a Shih Tzu (Snickers), 4 cats (Peppy, Gizmo, Lil Kitty, and Lindy), 2 chinchillas (Ivory & Ebony), 4 guinea pigs (Ozzie, Freckles, Baby Girl, and Zack), 18 wonderful chickens, 5 quacking ducks, and a beta fish RIP ChiChi & Chia <3
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Proud owner of a Shih Tzu (Snickers), 4 cats (Peppy, Gizmo, Lil Kitty, and Lindy), 2 chinchillas (Ivory & Ebony), 4 guinea pigs (Ozzie, Freckles, Baby Girl, and Zack), 18 wonderful chickens, 5 quacking ducks, and a beta fish RIP ChiChi & Chia <3
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post #26 of 57

i charge $2.50 a dozen for medium,and large, . i was at the store today and saw they were selling large brown cage free for $3.69 a dozen so i would say my fresh backyard cage free white and brown eggs are a steal for 2.50 a dozen.


Edited by blueseal - 4/10/12 at 1:19pm
post #27 of 57

Kroger's in Houston was selling a dozen organic eggs for $5.  Mine are just free range and I sell my eggs for $3 a doz or $4 for 18 count.   I can't keep up with the demands from family, friends and friends of friends.   I'll have to get more chickens.  I don't sort by size.  Most are about the same size.

post #28 of 57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katcrow View Post

Kroger's in Houston was selling a dozen organic eggs for $5.  Mine are just free range and I sell my eggs for $3 a doz or $4 for 18 count.   I can't keep up with the demands from family, friends and friends of friends.   I'll have to get more chickens.  I don't sort by size.  Most are about the same size.

This is the right idea, .to out compete your market. "Know what the market will bear," is often heard. Then, you can price at our slightly below to generate volume.
What we still dont know, however, is whether your production costs allow you to be profitable.

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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post #29 of 57

I always laugh when I hear organic. Who really knows for sure what the feed mills are grinding? And it's all organic anyway, whether the grain has been chemically fertilized or manure fertilized. And if it was manure fertilized, whose to say the cow ate organic feed?

 

I have to admit though, excellent marketing strategy the last decade or so!

A much more important factor would be - Are the chickens allowed to free range? Do their feet scratch dirt regularly? Do they have fresh supply of water daily? NO MORE BATTERY EGGS FOR ME!

 

I have been selling for a little over a month, with the purpose of helping the feed bill. $2/dozen for brown eggs of varying sizes. Adding everything, including my daily labor, I should be charging $3.77 per dozen, however, when I take out what we eat, and remove any labor and go strictly by the feed prices, it drops to $1.77 per dozen. So the $2/dozen works for what I am trying to accomplish.

Too many chickens to list!

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Too many chickens to list!

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post #30 of 57
@hearts 34... You also want to be careful about using the term, "organic."
Back in the 70s no one cared. Today, organic production is regulated. Using the term indiscriminately could bring scrutiny upon you. At the very least, it may start the questions.... Most people want to knew the same things you just brought up.

Better would be the notion that your eggs are fresh, and responsibly produced. "Natural and Nutritious" just has better ring than the worn out catch-all, "organic."

As for pricing, it's your choice. I stuck by the idea that you either let your customers tell you what they'll pay, or undercut the existing market by 5 or 10%. I doing advocate you sell your labor for zero, either.

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

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