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Brand New Incubator

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

So I just bought the 4250 model Farm Innovator Incubator with the automatic egg turner at Tractor Supply because I am wanting to hatch eggs for an agricultural project. I have had chickens all my life, I have just never hatched my own. I ordered some hatching eggs offline and I am also going to use some from my own coop. What I wanted to know was:

 

~What temperature is ideal for incubation?

~What humidity(s) are ideal?

~How long can eggs sit before they are considered infertile?

~Should eggs be cleaned before incubation?

~Does the incubator need to be cleaned if it is brand new?

~Do eggs need to sit before incubation? (I have heard that ordered eggs need to 'settle' before you place them in the incubator..)

 

I have tried to research all this information, but every website seems to say something different. 


Edited by champers44 - 2/15/16 at 8:41am
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by champers44 View Post
 

So I'm totally new to the world of hatching eggs. I have had chickens most of my life, but I just bought my own incubator to try and hatch some eggs. I ordered some fertilized eggs offline and I also am taking some of my own from my coop. I have looked at many different websites and forums and each one says something slightly different about what is needed to hatch eggs. I have a few questions about what to do..etc.

 

~What is the ideal temperature needed?     (I've seen 99-99.5, but I've also heard of 100-101)

~What is the ideal humidity?                     (This is the main question I've had..I have seen 55%%-60% for the first 18 days and then increasing it to 65%-75% during hatching..)

 

 

I bought the 4250 model from Farm Innovators with the automatic egg turner.

Temps depend on whether it's still air or forced air. Still air is 101-102F taken near the top of the eggs. Forced air is 99.5

There is no overall ideal humidity because there are too many factors. Egg quality, climate, hatchers habits, type of incubator. I prefer a low humidity incubation and I run at 30% the first 17 days and then at 75% for hatch because I open my bator during hatch. The trick is to find what works for you and your eggs. The best way to do that is to monitor your air cells during incubation. I use this method and highly suggest it, especially for styro bators as long as you aren't in a high altitude. http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com/blog/throw-away-those-incubator-manuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity  I would never incubate over 45% for the first 17 days, and even 45% to me is too high.

 

Make sure that you have checked all thermometers for accuracy prior to hatch. A bad thermometer can cost you your whole hatch.

 

Shipped eggs are trickier and there are tips and tricks to improve their rates. Not turning them for the first 3-4 days is one, incubating upright vs laying on side (which you already have the turner.) If you search shipped eggs threads you will find more insight and info, especially with wonky saddled shaped cells.

 

Wish you the best of luck!


Edited by AmyLynn2374 - 2/15/16 at 8:11am

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
post #3 of 7

:welcome

Quote:

Originally Posted by AmyLynn2374 View Post
 

Temps depend on whether it's still air or forced air. Still air is 101-102F taken near the top of the eggs. Forced air is 99.5

There is no overall ideal humidity because there are too many factors. Egg quality, climate, hatchers habits, type of incubator. I prefer a low humidity incubation and I run at 30% the first 17 days and then at 75% for hatch because I open my bator during hatch. The trick is to find what works for you and your eggs. The best way to do that is to monitor your air cells during incubation. I use this method and highly suggest it, especially for styro bators as long as you aren't in a high altitude. http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com/blog/throw-away-those-incubator-manuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity  I would never incubate over 45% for the first 17 days, and even 45% to me is too high.

 

Make sure that you have checked all thermometers for accuracy prior to hatch. A bad thermometer can cost you your whole hatch.

 

Shipped eggs are trickier and there are tips and tricks to improve their rates. Not turning them for the first 3-4 days is one, incubating upright vs laying on side (which you already have the turner.) If you search shipped eggs threads you will find more insight and info, especially with wonky saddled shaped cells.

 

Wish you the best of luck!

x2

 

Quote:
 

 

I have tried to research all this information, but every website seems to say something different. 

Welcome to the world of hatching eggs, where 10 people have 20 opinions on how to hatch! There are some super knowledgeable people out there, and it's best to find 1 hatching method and settle on it, then build on your successes and failures. In the end, you will develop a method that gives you the best results. The great thing about hatching eggs is that each hatch tells you something about your incubation methods, your eggs, and your incubator. For example, I used to incubate at around 50% humidity, which many people have done with great success, but I had a horrible hatch where the chicks were drowning inside their eggs. So I went with a "dry hatch," and have had better hatches since. Keep records of high and low temperatures, humidity, and other observations. These will help you get better and better hatches in the future. Also, join a hatching thread like Incubating w/ friends, "she said, he said" or find a current hatch-along and join. You will be connected with awesome people who know a ton about hatching. 

 

This link I found helpful in determining causes of bad hatches: http://www.mypetchicken.com/hatching-eggs/chapter-8-hatch-day.asp


Edited by beetandsteet - 2/15/16 at 9:01am

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088873/styrofoam-incubators-club ---Come join us! 

~Below Paradise Poultry~

 

Reply

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088873/styrofoam-incubators-club ---Come join us! 

~Below Paradise Poultry~

 

Reply
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by beetandsteet View Post
 

x2

 

Welcome to the world of hatching eggs, where 10 people have 20 opinions on how to hatch! There are some super knowledgeable people out there, and it's best to find 1 hatching method and settle on it, then build on your successes and failures. In the end, you will develop a method that gives you the best results. The great thing about hatching eggs is that each hatch tells you something about your incubation methods, your eggs, and your incubator. For example, I used to incubate at around 50% humidity, which many people have done with great success, but I had a horrible hatch where the chicks were drowning inside their eggs. So I went with a "dry hatch," and have had better hatches since. Keep records of high and low temperatures, humidity, and other observations. These will help you get better and better hatches in the future. Also, join a hatching thread like Incubating w/ friends, "she said, he said" or find a current hatch-along and join. You will be connected with awesome people who know a ton about hatching. 

 

This link I found helpful in determining causes of bad hatches: http://www.mypetchicken.com/hatching-eggs/chapter-8-hatch-day.asp

I vote for she said/he said  ;)  You'll get the help you need no matter whether you are hands on or hands off.  We accept everyone regardless of their philosophy. 

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmyLynn2374 View Post
 

I vote for she said/he said  ;)  You'll get the help you need no matter whether you are hands on or hands off.  We accept everyone regardless of their philosophy. 

And there sure is a lot of hatching philosophy out there :P 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088873/styrofoam-incubators-club ---Come join us! 

~Below Paradise Poultry~

 

Reply

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088873/styrofoam-incubators-club ---Come join us! 

~Below Paradise Poultry~

 

Reply
post #6 of 7

Oh and when you get to the point of candling this is a great thread to compare your eggs to:http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/261876/chicks-are-here-egg-candling-pics-progression-though-incubation

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by beetandsteet View Post
 

And there sure is a lot of hatching philosophy out there :P 

OMG yes!!! Nothing you do is right and everything you do is right.......lol

 

The object is to find what works for you, and if you are getting the results you want you continue with what you are doing regardless of other's opinions. Never let anyone make you feel bad or guilty (unfortunetly there are those that will) because they do not agree with your methods. This is a great community to find help and socialization in, but you have those that would just as soon yell at you instead of helping because they don't believe that's the way to do it.  Take opinions and listen to other's experiences and mold it to your comfort level and lifestyle. You'll do great.

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
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