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Rooster with Pasty Butt and Maggots!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have a BR roo that is about 6 months old. When he was a chick he had pasty butt and we would clean him up every day and it seemed to clear up fine. As he grew his tail feathers did not come grow normally but I assumed it was because we kept them cut back when he was young. Over the past couple of days he has been asking strange and weak. Last night I found him laying on the coop floor (he is always on roost at night). So I picked him up to separate and examine him. He has an awful case of what appears to be pasty butt. In addition he has Maggots on his back above the vent!! I sat him back down and complicated what to do and he went and laid in the corner of the coop. I came back out this morning and he was up moving around. Is there anything I can do the rehab him??? Is his quality of life too poor and need to be culled? I would prefer to attempt to rehab him, but I want to do the humane thing.
Thanks for All Your Help


Edited by mberry222 - 5/28/09 at 6:02am
21 ducks, 14 chickens, 2 geese, 4 peafowl, 4 goats, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 2 sugar gliders, and a tank full of fish!
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21 ducks, 14 chickens, 2 geese, 4 peafowl, 4 goats, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 2 sugar gliders, and a tank full of fish!
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post #2 of 11

I would clean the area completely and then reassess. Pics would help others to offer advice.

Wife to wonderful enabling hubby, Mom to DD and DS with 7 of his own. Leader/mommy of 2 Ameraucanas, 5 EE, 2 Austrolorps, 2 dominique, 1 orpington, 1 production red, & bantams-2 Sebrights, jap, modern, rir, orpington, wyandotte. 5+4+3 silkies. 2 mut banty roos
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Wife to wonderful enabling hubby, Mom to DD and DS with 7 of his own. Leader/mommy of 2 Ameraucanas, 5 EE, 2 Austrolorps, 2 dominique, 1 orpington, 1 production red, & bantams-2 Sebrights, jap, modern, rir, orpington, wyandotte. 5+4+3 silkies. 2 mut banty roos
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post #3 of 11

Maggots only eat rotting flesh, so he probably has a wound or an infection.  Like Jenni2142 said clean it up to see what's under the poo and feathers then reassess.

post #4 of 11

Disclaimer: I have no experience with chickens.

Horses acquire parasitic worms that come out through the anus and hatch into flies. Does this happen with chickens too?

Eat local! Backyard food if possible!
8 Production Reds, 7 EEs (1 roo), 4 GLWs, 3 SLWs (1 roo), 1 Silky cross roo.
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Eat local! Backyard food if possible!
8 Production Reds, 7 EEs (1 roo), 4 GLWs, 3 SLWs (1 roo), 1 Silky cross roo.
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post #5 of 11

first thing i would do is plop him in a tub and bath him completely, then you can really hold him and see what is going on...

my chickens enjoy their baths and they become very friendly- warm water with Dawn or Ivory

ROBIN-...Love all the feather kids - and yes, they all have names!

Glad you asked...I do run a chicken hospital!

Member of the Derperella Fan Club.... We're all just goin round the rooster here!

 Marek's Giant FAQ

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ROBIN-...Love all the feather kids - and yes, they all have names!

Glad you asked...I do run a chicken hospital!

Member of the Derperella Fan Club.... We're all just goin round the rooster here!

 Marek's Giant FAQ

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post #6 of 11

clean him gently but thoroughly, in a sink if you need to, so the maggots don't get all over the place. examine him closely - as others said, he may well have more than a simple surficial wound that attracted the maggots in which case - and based on your assessment that he is weak - i would immediately get him on oral or injectible antibiotics. also boost his nutrition right away, including 3 drops polyvisol liquid childrens vitamins (without iron) daily. offer enticing nutritional things to give him strength - eggs if he'll eat them, sunflower seed.... 
once bathed, keep him warm and comfortable in stress free environment. make suer he stays hydrated - sometimes fruit can help.
jj

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world" ~Ghandhi

"Procrastinate now. Don't put it off." ~Ellen Degeneres
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"You must be the change you wish to see in the world" ~Ghandhi

"Procrastinate now. Don't put it off." ~Ellen Degeneres
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post #7 of 11

The maggots were likely attracted to the pasty butt.  In the summer, it only takes a few hours before fly eggs hatch into maggots.  Let's hope they were all on the outside. 

Were you able to get them all off?

I'd pick him up and give him a thorough once-over and let us know some things:  what's he eating.  What are his poops like now.  Does he have any external parasites on his skin (check carefully, they're nearly microscopic and hard to see.) 

Check that rear end for rawness from the pasty  butt.  Or any injuries.  Check just inside his vent with a q-tip to make sure there isn't a spare maggot in there.  Have no doubt that maggots will eat into living flesh.

Clean the area thoroughly.  I would use hydrogen peroxide this one time.  Then flush the area, dry it thoroughly, and coat with neosporin ointment.  Put him where you can observe him and where he'll be separate from the other birds since he's weak.  He won't be able to be assured of eating in his weakened state.

Boost his nutrition.  First, you need to address the "why" of the pasty butt.  He'll need probiotics (yogurt - 1 teaspoon per cup of wetted pellets or crumbles, or fastrack or probios from the feedstore 1/4 teaspoon per cup of wetted food.)   Depending on what his droppings look like (green/solid with urates, brown puddinglike, rusty puddinglike, mucous or not, smelly or not, green diarrhea, yellowish and frothy, etc) you'll treat for the bacterial or parasitic problem causing his pasty butt.  IN ANY case he'll need probiotics.

I hope this helps as a start.  If you're worried about more maggots, you can get a screwworm spray for wounds at the feedstore.   Or get Swat ointment from the horse section - it's a wound ointment with a fly-prevention in it.  It's fowl-safe.  It's a great thing to have in your cupboard for poultry injuries.

Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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post #8 of 11

P.s.  personally I wouldn't go with an oral antibiotic because his gut bacteria balance is already off - thus the pasty butt.  If you dont' know exactly what the problem is, it shouldn't be treated with antibiotics.

Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you for all of the replies. Unfortunatly the problem was much worse that I though. After pealing back layers of feathers the maggots had eaten part on one wing and had already worked their way under the skin half way up his back. He was very weak and I made the decision to cull him this evening. It was my first and is very painful. I believe that I did the right thing, I did not want to see him suffer any longer. He was a great rooster that did not get a chance to really grow up. I wish I would have examined him more often. He seemed like a happy rooster up until a few days ago. I laid him down in a nice area in the woods.
Thanks again

21 ducks, 14 chickens, 2 geese, 4 peafowl, 4 goats, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 2 sugar gliders, and a tank full of fish!
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21 ducks, 14 chickens, 2 geese, 4 peafowl, 4 goats, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 2 sugar gliders, and a tank full of fish!
Reply
post #10 of 11

I'm very sorry to hear about your loss.  Unfortunately, this happens - they move very quickly and do not only stay in dead tissue areas.  I lost a duck to something similar and I know how horrifying it seems, but you did what you could to investigate.  It's possible that the maggots weren't there before, but they hatched and grew that fast.  They do that - they grow insanely fast and hatch within hours in the summer.  So please don't blame yourself.  At least he had some life and respect.

Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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