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FOWL POX do I treat lesions or leave them alone??????????

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

I have two hens ~8 month old my one hen has fowl pox witha few lesions on her comb and a few more appearing. I have been reading all I can find and have read that the infected parts can be treated with Lugols solution of Iodine. However, I also read that trying to treat the infected parts can spread the virus to other parts of the body. Is it better to treat or not to treat?
sad

I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
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I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
post #2 of 26

I too am very upset to find a couple of my 5 month old chickens develop black spots on their combs and wattles.  Some don't seem to be showing signs yet.  I find it hard to believe that nothing can be done to get rid of this.  You would think that using BluKote or Tea Tree oil (diluted) with a Q-tip would help to dry them up faster and prevent spreading to other birds.  From what I have read it last 3-5 weeks and then just goes away.  Really, is it that simple with no lingering affects?  Could they have another breakout in the future?  If they are bit by a mosquito next year, will they get it again?

I worked my butt off to keep my girls coop and run clean and dry this summer and now this!  I never expected it.

Can I get this from them?


Edited by critterlover - 11/5/09 at 12:00pm
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by critterlover 

I too am very upset to find a couple of my 5 month old chickens develop black spots on their combs and wattles.  Some don't seem to be showing signs yet.  I find it hard to believe that nothing can be done to get rid of this.  You would think that using BluKote or Tea Tree oil (diluted) with a Q-tip would help to dry them up faster and prevent spreading to other birds.  From what I have read it last 3-5 weeks and then just goes away.  Really, is it that simple with no lingering affects?  Could they have another breakout in the future?  If they are bit by a mosquito next year, will they get it again?

I worked my butt off to keep my girls coop and run clean and dry this summer and now this!  I never expected it.

Can I get this from them?


Apparently once they have had it and recover they have immunity (the dry pox).

No, from what I have read this is not transferrable to humans.

My hen appears otherwise healthy so I am not sure if I should try to treat the infection or leave it alone. I just don't want it to get worse as I have seen pictures where the chickens eyes are almost covered with lesions. I wish someone would advise me what to do.

Both my hens are laying at this time.

I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
post #4 of 26

You can treat with iodine, but you dont have to, as it will clear up. Also, I've heard that Fowl Pox, is not a permanent condition, and it does clear up, not 100% sure on this though.

Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one's definition of your life; define yourself. ~Harvey Fierstein
Had chickens for 2,499 days! -And counting!
Information on Fowl Pox, Coccidiosis & Mareks Disease.
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Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one's definition of your life; define yourself. ~Harvey Fierstein
Had chickens for 2,499 days! -And counting!
Information on Fowl Pox, Coccidiosis & Mareks Disease.
Reply
post #5 of 26

Also, I have fed my chicken a very healthy diet since day one.  I clean their water bucket every day and they get fresh greens and veggies every day.  I had hoped that would give them a healthy immune system so I could avoid problems like this.  When the host is healthy, it very often will deter parasites or at least make the host more resiliant from illness.

None of that seems to have made a difference with this.

We had a very wet spring and summer here in the North compared to normal, thus more mosquitos than normal.  Those of you who live in the South must have a lot of problems with fowl pox?

post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 

We have loads of mosquitoes here in the South especially in their coop. I have sprinkled DE in the coop and their nesting box - hope this will help. Someone suggeted giving vitamins and electrolytes to help boost their immunity I imagine so I will try this. I think at this stage I am not going to treat I am tooooooooo scared that I will spread the virus even more as it is highly contagoius.

I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
post #7 of 26

Fowl pox is a virus.  If bitten by an infected mosquito, they will develop the disease.  Once they have had it, they are immune.  DE will have no affect unless the mosquitoes decide to take a dust bath in it.  Remove standing water or use Mosquito Dunks, which prevent larvae from developing into adults.  Thoroughly spray the coops, runs and all areas where mosquitoes like to congregate with malation or a similar product that will kill mosquitos.  In addition, every night spray the coops with mosquito repellant.

Treating the lesions will not spread them unless you are careless and scratch or cut a bird than touch that scratch/cut with something containing the germs, such as a swab you used.

People cannot get fowl pox, nor can other mammals.  Other birds, however, can.  I personally believe that treating the lesions is important--it prevents secondary infection, and may help the bird progress more rapidly through the illness.  The scabs remain infective for months, so be sure to thoroughly clean and disinfect the coop after they are well.

Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

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Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

Reply
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thanks Sonoran Silkies. Is Lugols solution of iodine the best to use? Perhaps I could spray it on that way there would be less chance of transfer?

The following statement was on an information page provided by someone who posted as response to my question;

Prevention- This disease is cause by poor management. Good hygeine is the key to the prevention of this disease.

I only have 2 hens, my coop and run are cleaned frequently so I don't see how this can be the cause.

I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
post #9 of 26

I did not think I could safely spray mosquito repellant around the chickens.  I thought it would be bad for their respiratory system and may make them sick.

What is the best way to disinfect the coop?


Prevention- This disease is cause by poor management. Good hygeine is the key to the prevention of this disease.


I don't agree with this.  I just got my chickens this summer and the coop was spotless and painted fresh inside and out before we brought the girls outside.  I change water every day and have always used DE to dry things out.  I clean the drop board faithfully every morning.  I rake the run on a regular basis.  Mosquitos happen.

post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by critterlover 

I did not think I could safely spray mosquito repellant around the chickens.  I thought it would be bad for their respiratory system and may make them sick.

What is the best way to disinfect the coop?


Prevention- This disease is cause by poor management. Good hygeine is the key to the prevention of this disease.


I don't agree with this.  I just got my chickens this summer and the coop was spotless and painted fresh inside and out before we brought the girls outside.  I change water every day and have always used DE to dry things out.  I clean the drop board faithfully every morning.  I rake the run on a regular basis.  Mosquitos happen.


I absolutely agree.  There are diseases where hygeine can make a difference, but fowl pox is not one of them.  If you do not want to spray repellant, use the wrist bands impregnated with repellant and place them around the coop where the chickens cannot get at them.

Clean out bedding, wash and spray with a disinfectant that kills the fowl pox virus.  I would have to check the data sheets, but Vircon-S, oxine and novalsan are good disinfectants.

I have never heard of "lugols solution of iodine."  I simply use tincture of iodine.


Edited by Sonoran Silkies - 11/6/09 at 3:12am

Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

Reply

Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

Reply
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