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Anyone Have Pouter Pigeons ??? - Page 2

post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by josh44 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzawkieBantams 

I have a Pair of Brunner Pouter's LOVE THEM

http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee37/kadoo1975/2011-04-23164323.jpg

http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee37/kadoo1975/2011-04-23164313.jpg

Great info at this link HERE


Daren


NICE !!!  big_smile

REALLY LIKE THE COLORS big_smilebig_smilebig_smile


They are now in with my Silver pheasants for a bigger, and more of  a area for flight

post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 

Does anyone show their Pouters ??? pop

How do you breed pigeons for show ?

I've shown Bantams succesfully for several years, but have recently decided, I would like to try to breed & show pigeons.

Thinking of going the Exhibition Pigeon Rought thumbsup

Any Ideas on where to start  ?  idunno

post #13 of 27

We currently have a dozen or so bohemian pouters in yellow, red, black, and almond.  We just got out of the swing pouters last year and had them in red, yellow, and black.  I also used to raise pomeranian pouters and had close to 60 of them in all colors.  There are people in my poultry club that also raise Brunners, Pygmies, Pomeranian, Swing, Czech Ice Pouters.  I've also seen a couple of them with Norwich, Vorberg and Dutch croppers too.   We have a couple guys trying to recreate the Starwitzer pouter.   I'm also lucky that the secretary for the national American Pouter Association only lives 14 miles away and practically is a godfather to my kid. 

Showing pigeons isn't much different than poultry.  Most of it is about conditioning.  You have to have them NPA seamless banded within a  couple weeks of being hatched with proper size for their breed.  Pigeons only raise 2 young at a time too and maybe only have 3 clutches a year at the most usually.  They are also pairs only....  Its not like chickens where you have 1 cock with multiple hens.  You don't have alot to choose from like you do with a whole batch of chickens.  You plan your pairings very carefully and keep in mind conformation and color. 

Showing pigeons also has 3 branches....  flying, fancy, or utility.  Flying birds are your rollers, tumblers, show homers, etc.  They are based on performance.  Fancy breeds are your pouters, modenas, swallows, owls, etc.  Pretty, but the kind of birds that are usually never flown.  Utility are your meat birds (or the kind bred for it at least)...  show kings, carneaus, giant runts, etc.

What I've also found with showing pigeons is the judges allow ALOT more time for judging than they do in poultry.  Breed clubs usually hire their own judges for shows and have huge displays set up at shows.  Birds are brought up to a bank of cages under lights.  Chairs are set up around the judging area and after every class of birds, the judge explains why he placed them as such and opens it up to questions.  A big portion of the judging is how the bird stations or presents themselves.  You can have an absolutely spectacular bird, but if they refuse to blow you are s.o.l.  Case in point...my brother had a black swing that won alot of good sized shows up here in MN.  We drove down to nationals in Des Moines IA.  10+ hours on the road, 7,000+ birds there to distract him, and he just sat there with stage fright.  You also do alot more cage training with pigeons than most chickens.  You can't just throw them in a show coop and expect them to be totally charming.  If they aren't used to it they will be breaking wing flights, tail feathers and crawling the walls trying to get out.

On the sour crop issue....  its usually your big blowers that are affected: the norwich, pom's, etc.  Their crop is literally so big and stretched out that food just sits in there and ferments.  This was one of the main reason I got rid of my pom's.  I had to hang them upside down in socks, squirt baking soda & water down their crops with a turkey baster, manually empty their crop, etc.  Anytime they gorge themselves on feed or water they are prone to it.  Nice warm days in the summer and you are refilling water pans....  They drink too much and they get it.  In winter if your pans freeze over and they go without water over night...  When you break the ice and fill them, they drink too much too.  You can let food in their cages 24-7, but make sure they aren't super hungry before you do so.  Alot of people lose birds after shipping because they just turn them loose in their lofts without limiting rations that first couple days.  They will gorge themself to the point that food gets stuck in there.  Certain seed diets with whole corn and the bigger trapper peas get stuck in there too.  Sometimes when parents are feeding their young or setting eggs, they wouldn't get off the nest for a lengthy period and then go chow down.  That would be enough to cause it too.   After a few years of having the pom's what worked for me was a pelleted diet available 24-7, heated automatic waterers, and watching them very carefully.  If you catch them soon enough, you can pull them out of it.


Edited by destiny_56085 - 5/5/11 at 11:12am
Isn't it ironic that only intelligent people understand the meaning of "ignorance is bliss"?
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Isn't it ironic that only intelligent people understand the meaning of "ignorance is bliss"?
Reply
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 

WOW pomeranian & Pygmie pouters look awesome ! big_smile

I like tall, leggy,& slim up right birds  wink

How many types of pouters are there ???

post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 

What should I feed my Pigeons ?

I am feeding mine Gamecock mixtures & Conditioners.

It's about 18 % protein,

Corn & cracked corn,
Small Pieces of dog food,
wheat,
oats,
calf mana,
Layer Pellet
sunflower seeds,
Milo,
peas,
& other types of grains & seeds.
I also allow my Pigeons to fly around outside of their loft, for sun & fresh greens.

Is this fine ? Or what should I Feed ?

Is 18 % Protein good enough or to much or too little ?

post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by destiny_56085 

We currently have a dozen or so bohemian pouters in yellow, red, black, and almond.  We just got out of the swing pouters last year and had them in red, yellow, and black.  I also used to raise pomeranian pouters and had close to 60 of them in all colors.  There are people in my poultry club that also raise Brunners, Pygmies, Pomeranian, Swing, Czech Ice Pouters.  I've also seen a couple of them with Norwich, Vorberg and Dutch croppers too.   We have a couple guys trying to recreate the Starwitzer pouter.   I'm also lucky that the secretary for the national American Pouter Association only lives 14 miles away and practically is a godfather to my kid. 

Showing pigeons isn't much different than poultry.  Most of it is about conditioning.  You have to have them NPA seamless banded within a  couple weeks of being hatched with proper size for their breed.  Pigeons only raise 2 young at a time too and maybe only have 3 clutches a year at the most usually.  They are also pairs only....  Its not like chickens where you have 1 cock with multiple hens.  You don't have alot to choose from like you do with a whole batch of chickens.  You plan your pairings very carefully and keep in mind conformation and color. 

Showing pigeons also has 3 branches....  flying, fancy, or utility.  Flying birds are your rollers, tumblers, show homers, etc.  They are based on performance.  Fancy breeds are your pouters, modenas, swallows, owls, etc.  Pretty, but the kind of birds that are usually never flown.  Utility are your meat birds (or the kind bred for it at least)...  show kings, carneaus, giant runts, etc.

What I've also found with showing pigeons is the judges allow ALOT more time for judging than they do in poultry.  Breed clubs usually hire their own judges for shows and have huge displays set up at shows.  Birds are brought up to a bank of cages under lights.  Chairs are set up around the judging area and after every class of birds, the judge explains why he placed them as such and opens it up to questions.  A big portion of the judging is how the bird stations or presents themselves.  You can have an absolutely spectacular bird, but if they refuse to blow you are s.o.l.  Case in point...my brother had a black swing that won alot of good sized shows up here in MN.  We drove down to nationals in Des Moines IA.  10+ hours on the road, 7,000+ birds there to distract him, and he just sat there with stage fright.  You also do alot more cage training with pigeons than most chickens.  You can't just throw them in a show coop and expect them to be totally charming.  If they aren't used to it they will be breaking wing flights, tail feathers and crawling the walls trying to get out.

On the sour crop issue....  its usually your big blowers that are affected: the norwich, pom's, etc.  Their crop is literally so big and stretched out that food just sits in there and ferments.  This was one of the main reason I got rid of my pom's.  I had to hang them upside down in socks, squirt baking soda & water down their crops with a turkey baster, manually empty their crop, etc.  Anytime they gorge themselves on feed or water they are prone to it.  Nice warm days in the summer and you are refilling water pans....  They drink too much and they get it.  In winter if your pans freeze over and they go without water over night...  When you break the ice and fill them, they drink too much too.  You can let food in their cages 24-7, but make sure they aren't super hungry before you do so.  Alot of people lose birds after shipping because they just turn them loose in their lofts without limiting rations that first couple days.  They will gorge themself to the point that food gets stuck in there.  Certain seed diets with whole corn and the bigger trapper peas get stuck in there too.  Sometimes when parents are feeding their young or setting eggs, they wouldn't get off the nest for a lengthy period and then go chow down.  That would be enough to cause it too.   After a few years of having the pom's what worked for me was a pelleted diet available 24-7, heated automatic waterers, and watching them very carefully.  If you catch them soon enough, you can pull them out of it.


THANKS thumbsup
destiny_56085  keep the info coming smile

Very, Very Helpful

Didn't know there was a club, woot
can you post a link  ?

post #17 of 27

Here is a great page to peruse:  http://www.angelfire.com/ia/npcc/  Tons of pics and articles strictly dedicated to them.  Alan Blivien also has a really awesome yahoo group forum called theifpouters.  Here is the link to the National Pigeon Association:  http://www.npausa.com/

Isn't it ironic that only intelligent people understand the meaning of "ignorance is bliss"?
Reply
Isn't it ironic that only intelligent people understand the meaning of "ignorance is bliss"?
Reply
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 

Wanted to know since I am going Pouter CRAZY lol & I am pretty much likely to go look &  buy more Pouters big_smile

What is the average cost for Pouters ? I know there are different things to consider such as type & quality but what is a good price for them ?

Mine were given to me as a gift from a friend, & haven't seen or heard of any around here in San Antonio, TX.

post #19 of 27

To Answer Your Questions Pigeon Breeders  In Texas Are Scattered  Out Widely . And True Pouter Breeders Are  Few  I Had Some Good Birds But Sold Out And Gave  Away  Most.  If You Are Really Interested  In Show  Brunners There Is A  Man  In  Texas That Raises Some Of The Best . He Does Go To  National  And Louisville  And  Comes Away With Some Winners . Has With Chickens  Good Birds  Start  Out  About 50.00  Dollars  A Pair . This Time Of Year It Maybe Hard To Get  What You Want Due To Breeding Season. Make Contacts Now And Get On A List Of What You Want . Not Many Other Breeds Of Pouters  In Texas. There Are Some Starting Back And Some New Guys In Ok. That Have Different  Pouters  I Jugde The Shawnee Show  In Dec,  Had Around 100 Pouters  Brunners  Horseman  Holles  Reversewings And Afew  Others .  Brunners Are Smaller Than Pigmys  If You Get In To Quaility  Birds  . Send Me A Pm And Will Send A Name And Number To The Brunner Man . Price Depends On  Breeds As Far  If They Produce Well  And The Larger Breed  Are  More Expenseive

post #20 of 27

It depends on the quality of the birds. I have a pair of picas that are worth about 100.00$ On the other hand i have a 30.00$ pair to.
I have seen on the pouter loft form baelar pouters at 300.00$ a pair! ep

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Blessed with a great Family on a small farm. Check out our website.
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